A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale
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Product Description

“This majestic, moving novel is an instant classic, a book that will be read, discussed and taught beyond the rest of our lives.”—Chicago Tribune

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, A Lesson Before Dying is a deep and compassionate novel about a young man who returns to 1940s Cajun country to visit a black youth on death row for a crime he didn''t commit. Together they come to understand the heroism of resisting.

From the critically acclaimed author of A Gathering of Old Men and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.



Amazon.com Review

Oprah Book Club® Selection, September 1997: In a small Cajun community in 1940s Louisiana, a young black man is about to go to the electric chair for murder. A white shopkeeper had died during a robbery gone bad; though the young man on trial had not been armed and had not pulled the trigger, in that time and place, there could be no doubt of the verdict or the penalty.

"I was not there, yet I was there. No, I did not go to the trial, I did not hear the verdict, because I knew all the time what it would be..." So begins Grant Wiggins, the narrator of Ernest J. Gaines''s powerful exploration of race, injustice, and resistance, A Lesson Before Dying. If young Jefferson, the accused, is confined by the law to an iron-barred cell, Grant Wiggins is no less a prisoner of social convention. University educated, Grant has returned to the tiny plantation town of his youth, where the only job available to him is teaching in the small plantation church school. More than 75 years after the close of the Civil War, antebellum attitudes still prevail: African Americans go to the kitchen door when visiting whites and the two races are rigidly separated by custom and by law. Grant, trapped in a career he doesn''t enjoy, eaten up by resentment at his station in life, and angered by the injustice he sees all around him, dreams of taking his girlfriend Vivian and leaving Louisiana forever. But when Jefferson is convicted and sentenced to die, his grandmother, Miss Emma, begs Grant for one last favor: to teach her grandson to die like a man.

As Grant struggles to impart a sense of pride to Jefferson before he must face his death, he learns an important lesson as well: heroism is not always expressed through action--sometimes the simple act of resisting the inevitable is enough. Populated by strong, unforgettable characters, Ernest J. Gaines''s A Lesson Before Dying offers a lesson for a lifetime.

Review

"This majestic, moving novel is an instant classic, a book that will be read, discussed and taught beyond the rest of our lives." — Chicago Tribune

" A Lesson Before Dying reconfirms Ernest J. Gaines''s position as an important American writer." — Boston Globe

"Enormously moving. . . . Gaines unerringly evokes the place and time about which he writes." — Los Angeles Times

“A quietly moving novel [that] takes us back to a place we''ve been before to impart a lesson for living.” — San Francisco Chronicle

From the Inside Flap

From the author of A Gathering of Old Men and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman comes a deep and compassionate novel. A young man who returns to 1940s Cajun country to teach visits a black youth on death row for a crime he didn''t commit. Together they come to understand the heroism of resisting.

From the Back Cover

From the author of A Gathering of Old Men and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman comes a deep and compassionate novel. A young man who returns to 1940s Cajun country to teach visits a black youth on death row for a crime he didn''t commit. Together they come to understand the heroism of resisting.

About the Author

Ernest Gaines was born on a plantation in Pointe Coupée Parish near New Roads, Louisiana, which is the Bayonne of all his fictional works. He is writer-in-residence emeritus at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. In 1993 Gaines received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship for his lifetime achievements. In 1996 he was named a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, one of France’s highest decorations. He and his wife, Dianne, live in Oscar, Louisiana.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

I was not there, yet I was there. No, I did not go to the trial, I did not hear the verdict, because I knew all the time what it would be. Still, I was there. I was there as much as anyone else was there. Either I sat behind my aunt and his godmother or I sat beside them. Both are large women, but his godmother is larger. She is of average height, five four, five five, but weighs nearly two hundred pounds. Once she and my aunt had found their places--two rows behind the table where he sat with his court-appointed attorney--his godmother became as immobile as a great stone or as one of our oak or cypress stumps. She never got up once to get water or go to the bathroom down in the basement. She just sat there staring at the boy''s clean-cropped head where he sat at the front table with his lawyer. Even after he had gone to await the jurors'' verdict, her eyes remained in that one direction. She heard nothing said in the courtroom. Not by the prosecutor, not by the defense attorney, not by my aunt. (Oh, yes, she did hear one word--one word, for sure: "hog.") It was my aunt whose eyes followed the prosecutor as he moved from one side of the courtroom to the other, pounding his fist into the palm of his hand, pounding the table where his papers lay, pounding the rail that separated the jurors from the rest of the courtroom. It was my aunt who followed his every move, not his godmother. She was not even listening. She had gotten tired of listening, She knew, as we all knew, what the outcome would be. A white man had been killed during a robbery, and though two of the robbers had been killed on the spot, one had been captured, and he, too, would have to die. Though he told them no, he had nothing to do with it, that he was on his way to the White Rabbit Bar and Lounge when Brother and Bear drove up beside him and offered him a ride. After he got into the car, they asked him if he had any money. When he told them he didn''t have a solitary dime, it was then that Brother and Bear started talking credit, saying that old Gropé should not mind crediting them a pint since he knew them well, and he knew that the grinding season was coming soon, and they would be able to pay him back then.

The store was empty, except for the old storekeeper, Alcee Gropé, who sat on a stool behind the counter. He spoke first. He asked Jefferson about his godmother. Jefferson told him his nannan was all right. Old Gropé nodded his head. "You tell her for me I say hello," he told Jefferson. He looked at Brother and Bear. But he didn''t like them. He didn''t trust them. Jefferson could see that in his face. "Do for you boys?" he asked. "A bottle of that Apple White, there, Mr. Gropé" Bear said. Old Gropé got the bottle off the shelf, but he did not set it on the counter. He could see that the boys had already been drinking, and he became suspicious. "You boys got money?" he asked. Brother and Bear spread out all the money they had in their pockets on top of the counter. Old Gropé counted it with his eyes. "That''s not enough," he said. "Come on, now, Mr. Gropé," they pleaded with him. "You know you go''n get your money soon as grinding start." "No," he said. "Money is slack everywhere. You bring the money, you get your wine." He turned to put the bottle back on the shelf. One of the boys, the one called Bear, started around the counter."You, stop there," Gropé told him. "Go back." Bear had been drinking, and his eyes were glossy, he walked unsteadily, grinning all the time as he continued around the counter. "Go back," Gropé told him. "I mean, the last time now--go back." Bear continued. Gropé moved quickly toward the cash register, where he withdrew a revolver and started shooting. Soon there was shooting from another direction. When it was quiet again, Bear, Gropé, and Brother were all down on the floor, and only Jefferson was standing.

He wanted to run, but he couldn''t run. He couldn''t even think. He didn''t know where he was. He didn''t know how he had gotten there. He couldn''t remember ever getting into the car. He couldn''t remember a thing he had done all day.

He heard a voice calling. He thought the voice was coming from the liquor shelves. Then he realized that old Gropé was not dead, and that it was he who was calling. He made himself go to the end of the counter. He had to look across Bear to see the storekeeper. Both lay between the counter and the shelves of alcohol. Several bottles had broken, and alcohol and blood covered their bodies as well as the floor. He stood there gaping at the old man slumped against the bottom shelf of gallons and half gallons of wine. He didn''t know whether he should go to him or whether he should run out of there. The old man continued to call: "Boy? Boy? Boy?" Jefferson became frightened. The old man was still alive. He had seen him. He would tell on him. Now he started babbling. "It wasn''t me. It wasn''t me, Mr. Gropé. It was Brother and Bear. Brother shot you. It wasn''t me. They made me come with them. You got to tell the law that, Mr. Gropé. You hear me Mr. Gropé?"

But he was talking to a dead man.

Still he did not run. He didn''t know what to do. He didn''t believe that this had happened. Again he couldn''t remember how he had gotten there. He didn''t know whether he had come there with Brother and Bear, or whether he had walked in and seen all this after it happened.

He looked from one dead body to the other. He didn''t know whether he should call someone on the telephone or run. He had never dialed a telephone in his life, but he had seen other people use them. He didn''t know what to do. He was standing by the liquor shelf, and suddenly he realized he needed a drink and needed it badly. He snatched a bottle off the shelf, wrung off the cap, and turned up the bottle, all in one continuous motion. The whiskey burned him like fire--his chest, his belly, even his nostrils. His eyes watered; he shook his head to clear his mind. Now he began to realize where he was. Now he began to realize fully what had happened. Now he knew he had to get out of there. He turned. He saw the money in the cash register, under the little wire clamps. He knew taking money was wrong. His nannan had told him never to steal. He didn''t want to steal. But he didn''t have a solitary dime in his pocket. And nobody was around, so who could say he stole it? Surely not one of the dead men.

He was halfway across the room, the money stuffed inside his jacket pocket, the half bottle of whiskey clutched in his hand, when two white men walked into the store.

That was his story.

The prosecutor''s story was different. The prosecutor argued that Jefferson and the other two had gone there with the full intention of robbing the old man and killing him so that he could not identify them. When the old man and the other two robbers were all dead, this one--it proved the kind of animal he really was--stuffed the money into his pockets and celebrated the event by drinking over their still-bleeding bodies.

The defense argued that Jefferson was innocent of all charges except being at the wrong place at the wrong time. There was absolutely no proof that there had been a conspiracy between himself and the other two. The fact that Mr. Gropé shot only Brother and Bear was proof of Jefferson''s innocence. Why did Mr. Gropé shoot one boy twice and never shoot at Jefferson once? Because Jefferson was merely an innocent bystander. He took the whiskey to calm his nerves, not to celebrate. He took the money out of hunger and plain stupidity.

"Gentlemen of the jury, look at this--this--this boy. I almost said man, but I can''t say man. Oh, sure, he has reached the age of twenty-one, when we, civilized men, consider the male species has reached manhood, but would you call this--this--this a man? No, not I. I would call it a boy and a fool. A fool is not aware of right and wrong. A fool does what others tell him to do. A fool got into that automobile. A man with a modicum of intelligence would have seen that those racketeers meant no good. But not a fool. A fool got into that automobile. A fool rode to the grocery store. A fool stood by and watched this happen, not having the sense to run.

"Gentlemen of the jury, look at him--look at him--look that this. Do you see a man sitting here? I ask you, I implore, look carefully--do you see a man sitting here? Look at the shape of this skull, this face as flat as the palm of my hand--look deeply into those eyes. Do you see a modicum of intelligence? Do you see anyone here who could plan a murder, a robbery, can plan--can plan--can plan anything? A cornered animal to strike quickly out of fear, a trait inherited from his ancestors in the deepest jungle of blackest Africa--yes, yes, that he can do--but to plan? To plan, gentlemen of the jury? No, gentlemen, this skull here holds no plans. What you see here is a thing that acts on command. A thing to hold the handle of a plow, a thing to load your bales of cotton, a thing to dig your ditches, to chop your wood, to pull your corn. That is what you see here, but you do not see anything capable of planning a robbery or a murder. He does not even know the size of his clothes or his shoes. Ask him to name the months of the year. Ask him does Christmas come before or after the Fourth of July? Mention the names of Keats, Byron, Scott, and see whether the eyes will show one moment of recognition. Ask him to describe a rose, to quote one passage from the Constitution or the Bill of Rights. Gentlemen of the jury, this man planned a robbery? Oh, pardon me, pardon me, I surely did not mean to insult your intelligence by saying ''man''--would you please forgive me for committing such an error?

"Gentlemen of the jury, who would be hurt if you took this life? Look back to that second row. Please look. I want all twelve of you honorable men to turn your heads and look back to that second row. What you see there has been everything to him--mama, grandmother, godmother--everything. Look at her, gentlemen of the jury, look at her well. Take this away from her, and she has no reason to go on living. We may see him as not much, but he''s her reason for existence. Think on that, gentlemen, think on it.

"Gentlemen of the jury, be merciful. For God''s sake, be merciful. He is innocent of all charges brought against him.

"But let us say he was not. Let us for a moment say he was not. What justice would there be to take this life? Justice, gentlemen,? Why, I would just as soon put a hog in the electric chair as this.

"I thank you, gentlemen, from the bottom of my heart, for your kind patience. I have no more to say, except this: We must live with our own conscience. Each and every one of us must live with his own conscience."

The jury retired, and it returned a verdict after lunch: guilty of robbery and murder in the first degree. The judge commended the twelve white men for reaching a quick and just verdict. This was Friday. He would pass sentence on Monday.

Ten o''clock on Monday, Miss Emma and my aunt sat in the same seats they had occupied on Friday. Reverend Mose Ambrose, the pastor of their church, was with them., He and my aunt sat on either side of Miss Emma. The judge, a short, red-faced man with snow-white hair and thick black eyebrows, asked Jefferson if he had anything to say before the sentencing. My aunt said that Jefferson was looking down at the floor and shook his head. The judge told Jefferson that he had been found guilty of the charges brought against him, and that the judge saw no reason that he should not pay for the part he played in this horrible crime.

Death by electrocution. The governor would set the date.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
1,912 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

DebSim
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I enjoy reading the novels that are assigned to my daughter''s ...
Reviewed in the United States on June 24, 2018
For the most part, I enjoy reading the novels that are assigned to my daughter''s literature classes. In 7th grade, they were assigned, "To Kill A Mockingbird." I hadn''t recalled the details, so I was very interested in the assignments. As a prelude to her 9th... See more
For the most part, I enjoy reading the novels that are assigned to my daughter''s literature classes. In 7th grade, they were assigned, "To Kill A Mockingbird." I hadn''t recalled the details, so I was very interested in the assignments. As a prelude to her 9th grade literature class, my daughter has to read, "A Lesson Before Dying" over the summer. I read it so that we can discuss it while she completes the summer assignment (she hasn''t read it yet!). I could hardly put the book down. It felt familiar to me, a 65-year-old African American woman. I never lived full-time in the segregated south, but I spent enough time visiting grandparents while growing up and hearing stories of that time period.

I "felt" the characters in the book and by the time the book ended I could almost cry. I was sad but proud at the same time. I was proud of the conflicted young teacher who was able to reach the young prisoner how to become a man before dying, and how both of them could be good examples of manhood in their poor country community. They actually learned something from each other. I was also proud of how the black community came together to show love and respect for the young man who had to die because of the racism in society.
42 people found this helpful
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eugene barnes
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A White Southerner''s View
Reviewed in the United States on November 6, 2015
I think it is impossible for a white man , as I am, who lived in the segregated South, to even begin to understand the depths of humiliation experienced by black people in our society. Mr. Gaines'' book helps one see, through a black man''s eyes, the daily, and lifelong... See more
I think it is impossible for a white man , as I am, who lived in the segregated South, to even begin to understand the depths of humiliation experienced by black people in our society. Mr. Gaines'' book helps one see, through a black man''s eyes, the daily, and lifelong degradation and deprivation inflicted on fellow human beings. It is a painful lesson but one we need to learn if we are to ever effectively remedy the racial bias that continues in our nation--on both sides of the Mason Dixon.
85 people found this helpful
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Angele Hodges
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A time to kneel, a time to stand, a time to walk
Reviewed in the United States on March 29, 2019
I really liked this book and how it told a story of a Black man falsely accused and sentenced to death for a crime he didn’t commit but it told so much more about courage, strength, intelligence, morals, ethics, and manhood as a black man. It spoke to the vicious cycle of... See more
I really liked this book and how it told a story of a Black man falsely accused and sentenced to death for a crime he didn’t commit but it told so much more about courage, strength, intelligence, morals, ethics, and manhood as a black man. It spoke to the vicious cycle of the absence of the black male in the black community and how we have lost so much as a people since slavery. Yet through the pain of it all God still provides us an opportunity to kneel and reach out to Him for strength for God also lost his child by execution due to a false accusation, God has also given us the will to stand and the power to walk in the face of adversity. WE MUST CHIP AWAY AT THE MYTHS LEFT BEHIND FROM SLAVERY AND ANCIENT & PRESENT RACIST BELIEFS AND WE MUST WALK WITH OUR HEADS HELD HIGH AND FOREVER FIGHT TO PROVE WE ARE WORTHY UNTIL OUR LAST BREATH!!!!!
Thank you Mr. Gaines for this lesson!!!!
14 people found this helpful
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Romaine White
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A nuanced view of the effects of a racist society
Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2019
The most interesting thing about this book is the complexity of its narrator, Grant. Instead of creating a hero fighting a racist society, Gaines paints a picture of a flawed man, torn between his personal struggles and the struggle of his community. Through visiting... See more
The most interesting thing about this book is the complexity of its narrator, Grant. Instead of creating a hero fighting a racist society, Gaines paints a picture of a flawed man, torn between his personal struggles and the struggle of his community. Through visiting Jefferson, the man on death row, Grant learns the importance of standing with his community. Grant realizes his flaws and by the end of the book, opens up about the anger and frustration he feels instead of taking that anger out on the people around him. Gaines captures the inner struggle of someone who wakes up everyday in a racist society and the unhealthy ways a person can process that. Fantastic characters, complex story and a unique perspective.
7 people found this helpful
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Sara Guilliam
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Lesson Before Dying could very easily veer into cheesiness or make it all seem so ...
Reviewed in the United States on August 4, 2015
Given the plot synopsis, A Lesson Before Dying could very easily veer into cheesiness or make it all seem so easy. A man is sentenced to death, and he''s going to bravely come to grips with it and teaches everyone a lesson about courage! Yeah, that is not this... See more
Given the plot synopsis, A Lesson Before Dying could very easily veer into cheesiness or make it all seem so easy. A man is sentenced to death, and he''s going to bravely come to grips with it and teaches everyone a lesson about courage!

Yeah, that is not this book. This book is better.

I think the book''s subtlety along with Grant''s sort-of emotionally detached narrating make it all so much more bleak. It is bleak. Jefferson was in the wrong place at the wrong time and there''s no clamor for appeals. The media isn''t swarming and demanding justice. The FBI doesn''t show up to analyze the crime scene and make sure the actual criminals are locked up.

Everyone accepts it. They hate it, but they accept it. The tone of the story and Grant''s narration made me feel the utter helplessness of the characters in their perfectly segregated little town. Grant is angry and trapped, and you wish he''d stop complaining about it and just do something and then you remember Jefferson, waiting for his execution without protest.

I can see how the storytelling could be unappealing to some, but I think having the story told from Grant''s perspective and realizing how they''re both trapped in many ways, by virtue of being black men in the South, was a really powerful choice.

I thought all characters were well done - imperfect, rough around the edges, and totally relatable.

Why not 5 stars? I think what would have made this book amazing for me would be a better understanding of Miss Emma''s motivations in going to Grant. I get that he was the teacher, but she always seemed to be teamed up with the Reverend so it was always a bit tenuous to me how Grant got involved. I also felt that Grant and Jefferson''s relationship went suddenly from being not good to good. It wasn''t clear to me what caused the change. I mean, it had to happen or what would be the point? But it had a bit of a "makeover montage" feel to it. Things were bad and then suddenly in a short period of time they''re pretty good with only hints of the hard work that should''ve gone into it.

Even though I just devoted a paragraph to that, those things were very minor in the scheme of the book. I still thought it was excellent. If you''re considering whether you should read it, I recommend you do.
24 people found this helpful
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GiGi
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Terrible and painful to get through. Terrible writer !
Reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2019
Had to buy this for my son for school. This book so boring, and very hard to get through. I was painful to read as though the writer had Asperger''s disease, focusing way too much on tedious details. Terrible read. Feel so bad for the kids that are forced to read this... See more
Had to buy this for my son for school. This book so boring, and very hard to get through. I was painful to read as though the writer had Asperger''s disease, focusing way too much on tedious details. Terrible read. Feel so bad for the kids that are forced to read this aweful book.
5 people found this helpful
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B. J. Hill
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great book about how to face death and life in the south as it was
Reviewed in the United States on October 14, 2016
This is a deep book concerning the life of a young boy on death row and the man who visited him till this happened. It also lets you know what life was like for the negro in the south in the 1950''s. The is done in a very indirect way but it is effective.I makes you think... See more
This is a deep book concerning the life of a young boy on death row and the man who visited him till this happened. It also lets you know what life was like for the negro in the south in the 1950''s. The is done in a very indirect way but it is effective.I makes you think of many things-death,and life
how do we want to deal with any of it. Something we don''t think about enough,I think.
14 people found this helpful
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H.C. Livingood
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book, great author, do not read while doing the laundry.
Reviewed in the United States on October 19, 2018
My first time reading Ernest J. Gaines. What an amazing writer! I would recommend this book to anyone interested in African-American culture, southern writing, human rights or a general interest in knowing something new. With that said, I do not recommend washing the... See more
My first time reading Ernest J. Gaines. What an amazing writer! I would recommend this book to anyone interested in African-American culture, southern writing, human rights or a general interest in knowing something new. With that said, I do not recommend washing the book with the laundry. As you can see, this copy won’t be a reread. 💩
6 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Crystal Tips
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Book was described as good. I would not say so as the pages ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 19, 2018
Book was described as good. I would not say so as the pages are yellow and looks worn. This was not described in the description as I would not have bought it.
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Laurie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
please i have said what i wish to
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 14, 2019
Wonderful, thank you. I have just finished reading it today.
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Unknown
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 7, 2018
Sad but interesting realisation. Can''t help but feel sorry for him. Great book to read.
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Lava1964
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not bad--but predictable in showcasing racism
Reviewed in Canada on March 15, 2014
This novel is set in rural Louisiana in the late 1940s. The main character is Grant Wiggins, the most educated black man in a parish where educated blacks are rare. Against his wishes Wiggins becomes a teacher--actually the only teacher--at an impoverished one-room school...See more
This novel is set in rural Louisiana in the late 1940s. The main character is Grant Wiggins, the most educated black man in a parish where educated blacks are rare. Against his wishes Wiggins becomes a teacher--actually the only teacher--at an impoverished one-room school close to home. (He''d much rather leave the parish entirely and look for greener pastures to make his mark in life.) But that''s not too impotant to the plot. Wiggins is cajoled by his family members to "make a human" out of an ignorant black man, Jefferson, who is about to be rightfully executed for his involvement in a liquor store robbery that turned into the murder of the proprietor. Author Gaines attempts to make the reader feel pity for Jefferson and for Wiggins at the same time because they have difficult lives. Personally, it''s tough for me to muster any sympathy for anyone who allows himself to get involved with a robbery/murder, so Gaines failed to persuade me to believe that Jefferson is just another victim of race prejudice. I suspect this novel will become more of a mandatory read for high-school students than it already is, as it fits the category of books that today''s English teachers love: the oppressed minorities being held back by social circumstances beyond their control. Still, I''ll give it four stars out of five.
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Reem
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Love the new book smell
Reviewed in Canada on November 11, 2019
Good read
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A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

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A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

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A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

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A online sale Lesson Before high quality Dying (Oprah's Book Club) outlet sale

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