Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale
Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale__left
Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale__right

Description

Product Description

In this sweeping novel, James A. Michener chronicles eight tumultuous centuries as three Polish families live out their destinies. The Counts Lubonski, the petty nobles Bukowksi, and the peasants Buk are at some times fiercely united, at others tragically divided. With an inspiring tradition of resistance to brutal invaders, from the barbarians to the Nazis, and a heritage of pride that burns through eras of romantic passion and courageous solidarity, their common story reaches a breathtaking culmination in the historic showdown between the ruthless Communists and rebellious farmers of the modern age. Like the heroic land that is its subject, Poland teems with vivid events, unforgettable characters, and the unfolding drama of an entire nation.
 
Praise for Poland
 
“Engrossing . . . a page-turner in the grand Michener tradition.” The Washington Post
 
“A Michener epic is far more than a bedtime reader, it’s an experience. Poland is a monumental effort, a magnificent guide to a better understanding of the country’s tribulations.” Chicago Tribune
 
“Stunning . . . an unmatched overview of Polish history . . . The families themselves come very much alive, and through them, Poland itself.” USA Today
 
“A titanic documentary novel.” The Wall Street Journal

Review

“Engrossing . . . a page-turner in the grand Michener tradition.” The Washington Post
 
“A Michener epic is far more than a bedtime reader, it’s an experience. Poland is a monumental effort, a magnificent guide to a better understanding of the country’s tribulations.” Chicago Tribune
 
“Stunning . . . an unmatched overview of Polish history . . . The families themselves come very much alive, and through them, Poland itself.” USA Today
 
“A titanic documentary novel.” The Wall Street Journal

About the Author

James A. Michener was one of the world’s most popular writers, the author of more than forty books of fiction and nonfiction, including the Pulitzer Prize–winning Tales of the South Pacific, the bestselling novels The Source, Hawaii, Alaska, Chesapeake, Centennial, Texas, Caribbean, and Caravans, and the memoir The World Is My Home. Michener served on the advisory council to NASA and the International Broadcast Board, which oversees the Voice of America. Among dozens of awards and honors, he received America’s highest civilian award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in 1977, and an award from the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities in 1983 for his commitment to art in America. Michener died in 1997 at the age of ninety.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

In a small Polish farm community, during the fall planting season of 1981, events occurred which electrified the world, sending reverberations of magnitude to capitals as diverse as Washington, Peking and especially Moscow.
 
This village of Bukowo, 763 souls, stood at the spot where the great river Vistula turns to the north in its stately passage from its birthplace in the Carpathian Mountains at the south to its destiny in the Baltic Sea at the north. In the little settlement there was a stone castle erected in A.D. 914 as a guard against marauders from the east, but this had been destroyed in the early years when those marauders arrived in stupefying force. Each subsequent owner of the village had planned at one time or other either to tear down the ruins or rebuild them, but none had done so because the old castle exercised a spell on all who saw it, and there was a legend among the villagers that so long as their ruined tower stood, they would stand. There must have been some truth to this because there had often been great clamor in Bukowo, but like its doomed tower, it still stood.
 
Nearly thirty-six million Poles, of whom eighteen million were of voting age, were controlled by the Communist party of only three million members. This minority had made a symbolic concession right at the start of the present trouble. They agreed to hold the discussions over farm policy in the very village from which the principal protester came, and this was interpreted by all as a sincere gesture of good will, but as Janko Buk, the leader they were trying to placate, said: “With the steel strikers giving them so much trouble in Gdansk, they can’t afford to have us on their backs, too.”
 
The Communists had chosen this village for several additional reasons. It lay in the heart of a large agricultural district and was thus representative. It was also well removed from any big city whose practiced agitators might try to influence or even disrupt proceedings. And perhaps most important, it was near the recently renovated Bukowski palace, with its seventy rooms available for meetings of whatever size might be required.
 
The three names—Buk for the peasant leader of the troubles, Bukowo for his village, and Bukowski for the family which had once owned the palace—obviously stemmed from the same root, the strong word buk signifying beech tree, and this was appropriate because from time past remembering, the vast area east of the river had contained a large forest whose principal trees had been oaks, pines, ash, maples and especially beech, those tall, heavy trees with excellent trunks. Through the centuries foresters had selectively cut these trees, sometimes floating the great trunks all the way to the Baltic for shipment to Hamburg and Antwerp, but all the woodsmen had carefully tended a particularly noble stand of beech that defined the eastern edge of the village. Like the castle which they resembled, the beeches of Bukowo possessed a special grace.
 
The great forest of which they formed such a major part had not borne a name until A.D. 888, when the extremely primitive people who lived between it and the river were frightened by a semi-madman who lived amongst them. He claimed that one evening while returning home with a bundle of faggots collected from under the beech trees, he had been accosted by the devil, who wore about his neck long chains which clinked and clanged, and he convinced them, especially the children, that if they listened closely when the devil was afoot, they could hear the rattling chains.
 
The dense woods was named the Forest of Szczek in that long-ago year, and everyone agreed that the name was well chosen, for clinking, clanging sounds did often come from this forest, and since in Polish the letter e—if printed with an accent, ę—carries an n sound, the word was pronounced shtchenk, which resembles the sound that a chain clinking would make.
 
The villagers protected the ruins of their good-luck castle and tended the beech trees they loved, but they were proudest of their palace. It had been assembled in rambling style over many centuries by the poor Bukowskis, who had been little better than peasants themselves although acknowledged as petty nobles, and in grand style by the Bukowskis of 1896, who had stumbled upon a fortune.
 
The palace stood on a slight rise overlooking the castle ruins and the Vistula beyond and was a place of real magnificence, the equal of the lesser French châteaux along the Loire. Shaped like a two-story capital U, the open part with its two protruding wings facing west, its long major base faced east, overlooking the village and the forest beyond. It had been heavily damaged in the closing days of World War II during the German defeat and the Russian victory, but its many rooms had been rebuilt in the 1950s and now functioned as a museum, a rest home for Communist party VIPs and a meeting place for major convocations. A good chauffeur could drive from Warsaw in something under four hours and from Krakow in less than three, so that when government officials selected Bukowo as the site for this important conference they knew what they were doing. Anyone who had visited the Bukowski palace once wanted to do so again.
 
A major charm of the setting was the village which perched at the edge of the forest. Even before the rude castle had been built or the forest named, a few hovels had collected here, and in the more than a thousand years which had followed, the number had constantly but slowly increased, with the addition of one or two new cottages every fifty years. Improvements came slowly, for the petty nobles who occupied the more permanent buildings that would evolve into the palace cared little about what happened to their peasants. Over a space of eight hundred years no cottage in Bukowo had other than a dirt floor. For nine hundred years none had a chimney, none had windows, and some cottages had passed a hundred years without acquiring a permanent door.
 
Yet improvements did slowly filter in, a wooden roof to replace a thatch, a slab of precious glass for a rude window, so that in time an attractive collection of harmonious, low, modestly colored cottages grouped themselves artistically about the three sides of a trim central rectangle. As with the palace, the open end faced the Vistula, with the backs of the cottages abutting against the grove of beech trees. Peasants who were born and raised in Bukowo preferred it to any other villages they knew, but this was a limited endorsement because many would have had an opportunity to see only those few that were within a dozen miles. Beyond that perimeter the villagers rarely moved.
 
That was Bukowo: primeval forest to the east, a splendid grove of beech trees, a snug village, a handsome palace, ancient castle ruins and, dominating everything, the majesty of the Vistula. Here was where the most advanced theories of the contemporary world would do battle.
 
Sessions would be held in one of the many medium-sized rooms on the upper floor of the palace, and there were six widely recognized clues by which those attending would be able to determine the importance of their meeting. In Communist Poland if guests invited to a formal discussion were of trivial position, only tea was served, in plain cups and from a plain pot. Guests slightly more important saw with gratification that the teacups were placed on a lace doily. Those of medium power sometimes gasped with pleasure when bottles of a delicious black-currant cordial called sok (juice) were to be provided, but one did not wield real power until the fourth level was reached: all the preceding plus a bottle of really good brandy.
 
If the visitors held truly high office, a plate of cookies would be added, delicious things wafer-thin and decorated with sugared designs, but if the official being honored held a cabinet position, or comparable rank in the army or church, or if he was a cinema star or a leading editor, a sixth mark of honor could be reached. In addition to the five customary degrees—tea to cookies—a final one appeared: actual sandwiches, made of the best bread, with thick butter and tangy cheese, or ham, or spiced chicken. Persons attending a meeting where all this was offered did not require medieval trumpets or modern cannon salutes; they knew they came with honors.
 
For the meeting of the agricultural consultants, sandwiches were prepared and a chocolate cake.
 
The Communist representatives reached the palace first, and custodians showed them to their rooms; with so many to choose from, it was easy to get one overlooking the castle to the south and the river to the west. Clerks and research assistants received rooms looking toward the beech trees, and some deemed these preferable, for the Forest of Szczek was in its own way as beautiful as the river.
 
The arrival of the cabinet minister occasioned a good deal of merriment, for his name was Szymon Bukowski, and everyone joked: “It’s nice to be in your palace,” and he had fun explaining that the Bukowskis who had owned this showplace were not from his Bukowskis, but nevertheless everyone kept calling it his palace.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
683 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Dan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It was personal
Reviewed in the United States on January 30, 2017
My dad was Polish. My grandfather was born in Lublin, Poland. My grandmother, also Polish, was born in Austria. Over the years, I wondered because I was also told that my grandfather was born in Russia. After reading this novel, I now know that actually made sense. This... See more
My dad was Polish. My grandfather was born in Lublin, Poland. My grandmother, also Polish, was born in Austria. Over the years, I wondered because I was also told that my grandfather was born in Russia. After reading this novel, I now know that actually made sense. This novel was an eye opener to say the least. James Michener has an uncanny ability to present all this historical information in a great novel. I was captivated and it was hard to put down. Everyone should read all of James Michener''s novels. They would be great in a history class.
68 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
BirdieTracy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poland
Reviewed in the United States on March 23, 2014
As a young reader I tended to be one of those people who ignored the explanations, forwards, letters from the author and so on so I could dive right into the story. Only later did I realize how much I was losing out on. I mention this because there are several pages at the... See more
As a young reader I tended to be one of those people who ignored the explanations, forwards, letters from the author and so on so I could dive right into the story. Only later did I realize how much I was losing out on. I mention this because there are several pages at the beginning of this book that provide background information that will give you a good base from which to begin the story.

Another consideration is that the book was originally published in 1983. Poland didn''t gain it''s independence from the Soviet Union until 1989, so things have definitely changed. It''s possible that some people may think there is too much description at times in the story. I believe some of that feeling comes from how open the world has become. Getting information on just about any subject is as simple as accessing the web. This was certainly not the case in the early 80''s when getting more information required a trip to the library. We can now not only check facts and get additional historical information but even see portraits of the people involved.

From invasions by Mongols and Tatars in the early 1200''s to the Soviet Union''s attempts at keeping them under control in the 1980''s the Polish people have resisted outside authority. One of the most surprising aspects of this story is how often an incredibly small group of powerful land (and people) owners sold out their country to foreigners thus leaving it open to invasion and division time after time. The wealthiest and most powerful nobles had nearly unimaginable power over the lives of the people they owned as well as the land, and the money to live beyond extravagantly.

For all of the turmoil, Polish people were incredibly adaptable. This is a country that suffered through deadly invasions, civil unrest, revolutions, and dissolution. Sometimes led by relatively benign rulers but many times by bloodthirsty invaders who looked at Poles as being subhuman. At one point, after being divided up between three other nations, it ceased to even exist. The people of Poland chose to never give up hope that it would one day become whole and independent again. They are an amazing group of people with a history to match.

The three families the story follows highlight Poland''s turbulent history well. Fortune comes and goes. Some are caught up in revolution, others in war and invasion. All have to learn to adapt and some do it more successfully than others. There are people of integrity and other descendants who are repugnant. In other words, they are a mixed bag just like any other group of people who are followed through time.

It''s hard for me to resist books like this. Authors who thoroughly research a subject and then create characters around it must work doubly hard. They bear the responsibility (some better than others) to be as accurate as possible and at the same time must tell a story that will engage readers. The few best give you a story about fictional people you come to care about while teaching history. They take history and humanize it. James Michener was one of the greatest.
121 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Greg Polansky
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Historical-Fiction
Reviewed in the United States on September 17, 2015
Given that this was my first Michener book, I was pretty sure I knew what to expect - a good story that spans centuries of history. And that is what I got. Oh, it''s not the full history, but then again, this is not a history book. This is a fiction with historical elements... See more
Given that this was my first Michener book, I was pretty sure I knew what to expect - a good story that spans centuries of history. And that is what I got. Oh, it''s not the full history, but then again, this is not a history book. This is a fiction with historical elements carefully and thoughtfully threaded in.

Framed by interactions in the present day (1981) between scions of two of the three families that Michener focuses on, the chapters of the book respectively focus on the invasion of the Tatars in the 13th century, the Battle of Grunwald in the 14th century against the Teutonic Knights, a huge time jump to the invasion of the Swedes in the 17th century, the Battle of Vienna in 1683 when the Poles (in my opinion) helped save Christendom, the era of the Partitions in the 18th century, a glimpse of Fin de Siecle Vienna in the late 19th century when Poles were without a state, the battle of Warsaw after WWI which was instrumental in saving Western Europe from the onslaught of the Soviets, and a powerful chapter taking place during the Nazi/Soviet dismemberment of Poland during WWII.

The book is a great introduction for those who wish to learn more about Polish history. Based on my own surname, and due to a lack of records that were destroyed, I am pretty sure my own family was of partial Polish descent in the area occupied by Russia in the 18th century. This makes the story more personal for me. And Michener makes the characters come to life by focusing on three segments of the population - the great landowners the Lubonskis (and why were they not included in the last chapter?), the petty nobles the Bukowskis, and the peasants the Buks. However, Michener is too deterministic. By this I mean that he knows the history of these fictional characters in the future. But they don''t know what will happen to their country. Still, he has them spout the future as if they all could know it perfectly. And he does this repeatedly. This gets annoying really quickly. Especially when it''s wrong or unrealistic, as in the time period when the Poles conquered and burned Moscow in the early 17th century and he has the characters only a couple decades later spout how strong Russia is and how it will conquer them.

Happily, some of his predictions did not come to pass given that modern day Poland, free of Russian and German and Austrian bondage, is one of the success stories of the European Union. And it has been free since 1989. Writing this in 2015, this period of Polish freedom marks the longest stretch of freedom (26 years) the Poles have enjoyed since the 18th century. Here''s hoping that freedom never ends or is curtailed again.

P.S. One of the eras that Michener skips is the height of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. For those interested in learning more about it, I highly recommend The Polish-Lithuanian State, 1386-1795 (History of East Central Europe) The entire series about East Central Europe is worth checking out.
34 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
PhredTop Contributor: Manga
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A reason why, for many years, I avoided historical fiction.
Reviewed in the United States on April 4, 2021
Somewhere in the novel, Poland, Michener does have a story to tell. If you dig deep enough it is rich in food for thought. Many parts of this novel are better told in other books that are content to address specific parts of Polish history. Overall, I can recommend Poland,... See more
Somewhere in the novel, Poland, Michener does have a story to tell. If you dig deep enough it is rich in food for thought. Many parts of this novel are better told in other books that are content to address specific parts of Polish history. Overall, I can recommend Poland, but it is a lot of book to get there.

Michener’s The Source blew through my family taking no excuses. From there I went back to James Michener’s initial grande success, Tales of the South Pacific. After that the tiles came and went leaving ever less mark and by the original publication of Poland, I was not interested. Recent comments among book readers I respect brought me back to Michener and specifically his as usual, horse choker, of a novel, Poland. The amount of research is impressive, except that this is fiction. Mitchener, among others taught me to be very leery about the one (a novel) as a path to the other (history). This is a many-sided problem not likely to be settled in a few statements. My particular problem became that the facts of history were often of sufficiently unlikely that the made-up stories of fiction could be too easily confused. My conclusion then and recommendation now is that readers should learn history from history books and be very careful about what they think they have learned about history from fiction.

It is possible that fiction can help provide a context and some personal connections that history is too dry to attempt. The purpose of a novel is, or should be a matter of being true to its made-up characters and the central problem that is the purpose of the novelist. These are all fine lines and distinctions. There are many logical arguments against the aforesaid, but at bottom all can bow to fiction in a novel. Little can bow to history. Going too far down this path leads to the madness of the Reagan Biography, where the biographer inserted himself into places and created dialogue that had no possible bases in reality. Whatever your take on this question, for me it stopped making sense to learn intentional fiction when the same tome periods were well covered by historians.

Before leaving this point, James A Michener lavished his personal time on the history behind his novels. One can waste time arguing against this or that fact, when the issue, in a novel, has to be the impact and import of the whole.

And so to this novel, Poland. Poland is a classic case the oft published theory that Geography is fate. Poland has no natural boundaries and its history is one of invasions. The local population at any given moment in time had a binary choice. Become good soldiers or become whoever the invade de jour demanded of you. Including what is portrayed as a typically Germanic technique, extinction by forced export and elimination of the native population and replacement with the invader’s people. Russia would do just this with neighboring Estonia. Michener would have us believe that the Germanic Knights started it.

With this as background, Poland takes us through a variety of episodes in selected periods of Polish history. The Poland he would have us understand was one where in a relatively few, super rich and titled barrons would insure that there was never a central government strong enough to threaten their local powers, If this meant that Poland would spend centuries under the ownership of some other national entity, this was no problem, as long as local power stayed with the local magnates. Live for the pheasants was pretty much always the same. Illiterate and depended upon the local lord and never expecting better than dirt floor hovels to call home. Droit du seigneur, the right of the feudal lord to rape almost at will, but especially being first to any village bride on her wedding night is not explicitly discussed. Michener is clear that the Lord could pick who married who and that the serving women expected to be used and made their plans accordingly. For all of this a high point the Poland is the large number of women who would achieve and exercise power on their own or through weaker male husbands.

Initially the episodic nature of Poland meant a parade of people, many who seemed important but who disappeared as soon as that episode was finished. On occasion we would see a character at the peak of their lives and have them re-appear briefly and their end.

Eventually the narrative achieves some period stability long enough for a reader to track some character growth. Mostly people quickly become their adult selves and then victim or vanquished per the duel and dueling dictates of history and the story.

Much of the time I was frustrated at the constant changes. Particularly that change most meant new names doing the old things. In the last third it became possible to be vested in particular characters. Michener is unblinking in his discussion of Poland’s cruel suffering under the rarely discussed Nazi Holocaust. And he is equally distressed with how easily Communist Poland sank into a mirror of its own dark past, if only now in the name of the proletarian rather than the inherited over lords.
Helpful
Report
Marci
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not one of his better books
Reviewed in the United States on October 15, 2019
I read James Michener''s books many years ago and decided to reread it before taking a trip to my families homeland Poland. For some reason I had difficulty getting through this book. There were too many long explanations which became boring. Although it took me through... See more
I read James Michener''s books many years ago and decided to reread it before taking a trip to my families homeland Poland. For some reason I had difficulty getting through this book. There were too many long explanations which became boring. Although it took me through the history of Poland up until the 80''s there was not a lot of information about WW2 that I had hoped for. The story tells of the life of three fictitious families who''s women were all beautiful and men who shined. A lot of information about music that just seemed to go on and on. I have read many of James Michener''s book that I enjoyed but unfortunately this was not one of his better ones. It took me a while to get through this.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Ron
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
History repeats itself and we need to remember that
Reviewed in the United States on April 29, 2014
If you want to understand the real insanity of war, with innocent people dragged into bloody murder for profit, ethnic cleansing, systematic suppression of democratic movements by established autocrats, and the almost unbelievable history of Poland being torn apart by other... See more
If you want to understand the real insanity of war, with innocent people dragged into bloody murder for profit, ethnic cleansing, systematic suppression of democratic movements by established autocrats, and the almost unbelievable history of Poland being torn apart by other countries, this is the book for you. And, at the same time, Michener brings you into each epoch of history with detailed descriptions of daily life to remind you all of this is real. There are more heroes and villains then I could have ever imagined, all living out the most glorious and disgusting aspects of the same range of human nature we see around us today. This is one of the best overviews of human frailties and disaster ever written. Have your high school kids read this book so, just maybe, they won''t get dragged into the next bloody mess.
31 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
A. J Smith
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If You Want to Know the Soul of Poland
Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2016
It’s hard to imagine a better primer on the soul of a nation and its people. Of course, this book was written in 1983 and a lot has happened in Poland since; however, the foundational understanding this book conveys about culture and ethos and passion is timeless. Above... See more
It’s hard to imagine a better primer on the soul of a nation and its people. Of course, this book was written in 1983 and a lot has happened in Poland since; however, the foundational understanding this book conveys about culture and ethos and passion is timeless. Above all else, this book made me appreciate how resilient the Polish people have been over the centuries. Time and again, Poland was overrun and physically destroyed by its neighbors from every point on the compass. Yet Poles never lost their spirit, never relinquished their pride, never failed to rebuild. A lesser people would have perished from the face of the Earth. If you want to understand Poland, read this book first, let it serve as a springboard for further exploration.
7 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must read -again- for those of us whose family have roots in historic Poland.
Reviewed in the United States on March 22, 2014
Today with attention being drawn again to the general region (Ukraine), Michener''s Poland is a reminder of the historical spirit, tenacity, and passion of the people of Eastern Europe. I only wish I understood more of what has happened in the region since the ending of this... See more
Today with attention being drawn again to the general region (Ukraine), Michener''s Poland is a reminder of the historical spirit, tenacity, and passion of the people of Eastern Europe. I only wish I understood more of what has happened in the region since the ending of this novel. I do have enormous pride in my family members who stayed to rebuild or who immigrated to America to bequeath this passion to future generations. To Anton and Josephine, my paternal grandparents, I salute your bravery.
21 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

P. Taylor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brings Poland to life
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 15, 2017
Brilliantly brings Poland''s history to life. I had no idea what the Polish people had been through but read it whilst on holiday in Poland and found it an excellent way of getting into the country and understanding it a little bit more. I was delighted to come across the...See more
Brilliantly brings Poland''s history to life. I had no idea what the Polish people had been through but read it whilst on holiday in Poland and found it an excellent way of getting into the country and understanding it a little bit more. I was delighted to come across the castles, towns, and people mentioned in the book, including artworks depicting historical figures that I could now recognise. I would really recommend it.
4 people found this helpful
Report
peter
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
good way to learn a little history
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 7, 2021
firstly for personal enjoyment and much later for teaching my grandchildren something about Poland
One person found this helpful
Report
Phil Smith
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This one is not for me
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 27, 2018
I''ve read a few James Michener books and enjoyed them but this one I found very boring in fact I only got halfway through and gave up.
2 people found this helpful
Report
Freda
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 14, 2017
Marvellous
One person found this helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My favourite author
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 17, 2020
This was a Christmas gift and was very happily received
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale

Poland: lowest online A Novel outlet online sale