Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online
Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online__front

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The most accessible policy text available.

Policy making is a political struggle over values and ideas. By exposing the paradoxes that underlie even seemingly straightforward policy decisions, Policy Paradox shows students that politics cannot be cleansed from the process in favor of “rationality.” Author Deborah Stone has fully revised and updated this popular text, which now includes many paradoxes that have arisen since September 11. Examples throughout the book have been updated, and the prose has been streamlined to make a great read even better.

About the Author

Deborah Stone is a renowned scholar who has taught at Brandeis, MIT, and other universities around the world. Her award-winning book Policy Paradox has captivated readers through three decades, four editions, and six translations―but who’s counting? She lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
300 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

james bedell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
confused
Reviewed in the United States on November 14, 2019
this was a book my wife got and read and i dont really understand how im supposed to review this because she read it not me. i saw her read it, though, so theres that i dont know what else you want from me.
16 people found this helpful
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Steven PetersonTop Contributor: Baseball
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Economics and rationality against the community and politics
Reviewed in the United States on March 28, 2016
This is a fascinating and thought provoking book on political decision making. I have used it as a text in my doctoral course on policy analysis for nearly two decades. She juxtaposes two models in this book. (1) The rationality project. This is where we use... See more
This is a fascinating and thought provoking book on political decision making. I have used it as a text in my doctoral course on policy analysis for nearly two decades.

She juxtaposes two models in this book. (1) The rationality project. This is where we use rational approaches to policy making, including economic analysis. The idea is to use neutral and objective data to make the best policy decision possible.The model for society and its functioning is the market, with its emphasis on self-interest and rational calculation. (2) On the other hand, she points out that this does not describe the political world. Here (see the chart on page 35), we see that community is important (not just self-interest), altruism has a role to play, cooperation and competition coexist, and so on. Politics is an arena where there is contestation over facts, values, even numbers. There is no objective, neutral evaluation of facts. The very nature of the economic, rational approach is contested.

The volume explores the debates between the political and rational models in such arenas as the goals for society, the nature of deciding on which problems should be addressed, and how solutions are addressed.

This is a thought-provoking work that will leave readers thinking about the nature of policy making and what is at stake.
22 people found this helpful
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KellyJo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
changed my view of social policy...
Reviewed in the United States on August 25, 2018
This book was required reading for a graduate social policy course. However, it is a book I reread after the course was over, as it (for me) increased my knowledge of social policy and interest in the topic as a social worker. This will remain on my bookshelf and be... See more
This book was required reading for a graduate social policy course. However, it is a book I reread after the course was over, as it (for me) increased my knowledge of social policy and interest in the topic as a social worker. This will remain on my bookshelf and be referenced often.
4 people found this helpful
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Rishi Kumar
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is a classic for good reason. It lays out concepts clearly
Reviewed in the United States on April 4, 2015
This book is a classic for good reason. It lays out concepts clearly, intelligently, and convincingly, all while sounding conversational and not overly technical, as is a pitfall of many academic publications. Stone''s frameworks are just that--frameworks--and are useful for... See more
This book is a classic for good reason. It lays out concepts clearly, intelligently, and convincingly, all while sounding conversational and not overly technical, as is a pitfall of many academic publications. Stone''s frameworks are just that--frameworks--and are useful for structuring one''s analysis of policy, while also recognizing that no real world situation fits the frameworks perfectly.

My one large critique of Stone is her extremely apparent liberal bias. While the ideas she presents are not inherently liberal or conservative (though one could certainly make the argument that the ''market model'' she argues against is a conservative one and the ''polis model'' she champions is a liberal one), the examples she draws to illustrate them are biased towards a liberal perspective. Whenever she presents something ''bad'' done in a policy situation, it is almost always a Republican or conservative doing it, while liberal ideas and actions are almost always presented as the ''right thing'' to do or a compassionate application of policy. Even as a liberal myself, it got a bit grating towards the end of the book. At times in certain chapters it seemed like Stone was soapboxing about an issue, even if that issue was only tangentially relevant to the topic at hand.

If you can get past the bias, and perhaps only skim the examples she uses, there is still a lot to get out of this book.
12 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great book, not just for students.
Reviewed in the United States on March 27, 2017
Such a good book! I got it for school, but it is something anyone would enjoy because Stone''s writing is pleasant and free of jargon. I learned a lot from this book and it made me reconsider how I think about politics in America.
2 people found this helpful
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Heatha
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very smart book but dense
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2017
We only used parts of this book which may have made it seem more confusing than it is. Very smart book but dense.
One person found this helpful
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Bee
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good
Reviewed in the United States on June 12, 2021
Good
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Bloop
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Extremely good, and will leave on my bookshelf rather than trade-in like other college texts.
Reviewed in the United States on August 4, 2017
Best book I''ve had to read for a class. Highly recommend for those interested in policy analysis, as this is a genuinely enjoyable read.
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Top reviews from other countries

Pinodome
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Basically good
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 7, 2012
I found this a very informative book on basic concepts of public policy. Stone does her best to give the readers an enjoyable read by not being ''informative and dry'' all the time. What I do miss is an overarching view on the concepts she outlines.
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Max Rawnsley
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Prelim comment
Reviewed in Australia on September 17, 2020
Pleased to see a reviewer comment on conservative -v-liberal bias We seem to be generally unable to approach a policy or many other matters with clear perspectives. Must be human nature.
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Matteo Sánchez
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in Spain on January 25, 2021
If you like politics, this book will be such a pleasure to read. It unveils not so obvious strategies of political communication and conceptualization of ideas.
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Joanne Waisglass
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loved it.
Reviewed in Canada on August 5, 2013
Deborah Stone took what could of been be a very dry topic and made it engaging and accessible for students. It made my course on process and formation of public policy much more engaging and enjoyable.
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Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online

Policy Paradox: The online Art online of Political Decision Making online