The Art sale of Living According to Joe Beef: A outlet sale Cookbook of Sorts online sale

The Art sale of Living According to Joe Beef: A outlet sale Cookbook of Sorts online sale

The Art sale of Living According to Joe Beef: A outlet sale Cookbook of Sorts online sale
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Description

Product Description

The debut cookbook from one of the most celebrated restaurants in Canada, featuring inventive twists on French market cuisine, plus spirited anecdotes and lush photography.

Earning rave reviews for their unforgettable approach, Joe Beef co-owners/chefs David McMillan and Frédéric Morin push the limits of traditional French cuisine with over 125 recipes (nearly all of them photographed) for hearty dishes infused with irreverent personality. The Strip Loin Steak comes complete with ten variations, Kale for a Hangover wisely advises the cook to eat and then go to bed, and the Marjolaine includes tips for welding your own cake mold. Joe Beef’s most popular dishes are also represented, such as Spaghetti Homard-Lobster, Foie Gras Breakfast Sandwich, Pork Fish Sticks, and Pojarsky de Veau (a big, moist meatball served on a bone). The coup de grâce is the Smorgasbord—Joe Beef’s version of a Scandinavian open-faced sandwich—with thirty different toppings.

Featuring lively stories and illustrations showcasing gangsters, oysters, Canadian railroad dining car food, the backyard smoker, and more, this nostalgic yet utterly modern cookbook is a groundbreaking guide to living an outstanding culinary life.

Amazon.com Review

Featured Recipe: Hot Oysters on the Radio

Serves 4

Ingredients
12 big, meaty oysters
Coarse salt for partially filling pan
4 slices bacon, finely diced
¼ cup (120 g) peeled and finely diced small potatoes
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
2 egg yolks
1/3 cup (80 ml) whipping cream (35 percent butterfat)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives
¼ cup (30 g) finely grated aged Cheddar cheese
Salt and pepper
¼ cup (30 g) dried bread crumbs
¼ cup (55 g) unsalted butter, cut into 12 equal pieces

Instructions
1. Shuck the oysters, pouring the liquor into a cup and keeping the oysters on their bottom shells. Set the oysters and liquor aside. A good trick for cooking the oysters is to fill a big cast-iron frying pan about half full with coarse salt, put it in the oven, and preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C), then heat the pan for an extra 15 minutes. This will help to accelerate the cooking process.

2. Place the potatoes and salted water to cover in a small pot over medium-high heat. Boil for 2 to 3 minutes, or until slightly softened. Drain the potatoes, let cool, and pat dry. Meanwhile, in another frying pan, crisp the bacon over medium-high heat until light brown. Add the potatoes to the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 4 minutes, or until tender. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Remove from the heat.

3. In a bowl, rapidly whisk together the egg yolks, the cream, and whatever oyster liquor you were able to gather. Add the chives, Cheddar, a pinch each of salt and pepper, and the bacon-potato mixture and whisk to mix. Divide evenly among the oysters, spooning it on top. Dust the tops with the bread crumbs, then finish with a piece of butter.

4. Pull the cast-iron pan out of the oven and carefully nest the oysters in the hot salt. Return the pan to the oven and cook for 4 to 7 minutes, or until the tops start to turn golden. Serve immediately.

Review

Finalist, IACP Awards 2012, Chefs & Restaurants Category
Winner of Food52’s Piglet Tournament of Cookbooks, 2012


“As I leafed through the pages I came to be charmed by their story and the unconventional way the book is laid out. There is a sense of history to the book and their deep love of Montreal is evident throughout. There is richness in detail and usually a lovely idiosyncratic story for each recipe that makes the book as much of an engaging read as a straightforward cookbook.” 
—Judge Alice Waters, Food52’s Piglet Tournament of Cookbooks, 2012

“One of the best cookbooks of the year. . . the stories by Frédéric Morin and David McMillan are worth the price.”
—Edward Ash-Milby, Buyer at Barnes & Noble 

“This bizarre and spectacular book isn''t like the other on my list—but then again, it''s not much like any other book I know of, cooking-related or otherwise. . . a kind of artist''s statement for an idiosyncratic and unlikely restaurant.” 
—Mother Jones, Favorite Cookbooks of 2011, 12/3/11

“Proof of Morin''s and McMillan''s creative culinary genius.” 
—USA Today, 11/22/11 

“Joe Beef is a Montreal restaurant worthy of a special trip north, as David Chang attests in his foreword to this “cookbook of sorts.” The free-form tome embodies the delicious chaos of the place, and the eccentric interests and oversize appetites of the men behind it—chefs and co-owners Frédéric Morin and David McMillan. There’s history here, including the tale of Joe Beef himself, the 19th-century Irish immigrant, Canadian tavern owner and “friend of the working man” for whom the restaurant is named. In addition to recipes, there are chapters on the history of Montreal eating (spotlighting the  casse-croute tradition of ramshackle snack shacks) and on trains—old-school rail travel being one of Morin’s enduring obsessions.  Cook this: Spaghetti  homard-lobster in bacon-brandy cream; stuffed dining-car calf liver in Parmesan-mustard crust; Joe Beef foie gras and cheddar cheese “Double Down.”
—Time Out New York, The Season''s Best Cookbooks, 11/15/11

“I believe everyone should eat at Joe Beef at least once. And I think everyone should buy this cookbook.”
—Food Republic, 11/14/11

“Inventive, meaty, badass cooking. And with these chefs, you get the sense that food and only food is what matters.”
—BonAppetit.com, BA Daily blog, 10/18/11 

“Beautiful, hip, both feminine and masculine at the same time. . . . The book conveys an entire atmosphere, a way of relating to food, yes, but also time, and love, and communication. The recipes are sexy, but in the way that Montreal is sexy. If you have been to Montreal, I''m guessing you know what I mean.” 
—Eating from the Ground Up, 10/11/11

“If one judges a cookbook by its idiosyncrasies, this fall''s best comes from Canada.  The Art of Living According to Joe Beef, by Frédéric Morin and David McMillan, will teach you how to cook a horse steak, make absinthe, tour Canada by train and cure a hangover (kale with bacon and fried egg). . . . But what makes this cookbook so great—and Momofuku Ko chef David Chang''s "favorite restaurant in the world," according to his foreword—is the confidence, humor and lack of pretense that allows Morin and McMillan to serve a mound of caviar next to a martini garnished with a Vienna sausage. Oh, those Canadians.” 
—Departures, 9/15/11

“This book, from the folks behind the Montreal restaurant David Chang calls his "favorite restaurant in the world," covers a fantastic range of topics. Sure, there are recipes, but there is also a history of the restaurants of Montreal, a paean to the trains of Canada, "Le Grand Setup de Caviar," a thirty ingredient smorgasbord, a martini recipe that calls for a Vienna sausage garnish, and plans for building a smoker yourself.” 
—Eater National, 9/12/11

“From the acclaimed Montreal restaurant come personality-packed tales of food and drink, like instructions for building a smoker and distilling absinthe.”
—DETAILS, The Year''s 10 Best Cookbooks, September 2011 Issue

“Touching on many of this fall''s themes—and simultaneously defying categorization—is The Art of Living According to Joe Beef: A Cookbook of Sorts by David McMillan, Frédéric Morin, and Meredith Erickson. While it is tied to a restaurant (Montreal bistro Joe Beef), it makes nods to regular folks, too, including, for instance, instructions for building a backyard smoker. But with recipes for Swedish sandwiches, recollections of favorite train trips, and a love letter to French burgundy, this is one cookbook that—happily, for us—eschews all the trends.”
—Publishers Weekly, Top 10 Fall Cookbooks, 6/27/11

“A savvy page-turner full of meats, oysters, attitude and irreverence.”
—Publishers Weekly, 6/20/11

“Fred, Dave, and Meredith are a significant part of what makes Montreal dangerous—and delicious—to anyone who loves food. The words Joe Beef are synonymous with good food and good times.”
—ANTHONY BOURDAIN
 
“This is the most amazing cookbook of the last ten years. As a longtime fan of the restaurant and its staff, I can tell you that Joe Beef is more than just an eatery. It embodies a way of looking at food and life, a zeitgeist, that I thought was impossible to capture in print. I was wrong. If you want to cook in a gutsy, honest, meat-centric, modernist aesthetic—then look no further.”
—ANDREW ZIMMERN, award-winning chef, author, and host of Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern
 
“Eating at Joe Beef is the most heartwarming, delicious time you will have north of the border. Fred and David are truly talented artisans and gastronomes dedicated to flavor, technique, and downright old-world hospitality. Read this book; it’ll make your mouth water.”
—FRANK CASTRONOVO and FRANK FALCINELLI, chefs/owners, Frankies Spuntino
  
“This cookbook is crazy delicious, just like the restaurant—full of fun, flavor, philosophy, and food.”
—BONNIE STERN, founder, Bonnie Stern School of Cooking
 
“Fred and Dave sont des vrais (are the real thing). They were hunting, fishing, foraging, butchering whole animals, and growing their own vegetables long before it was cool. I could go on about how these boys cook (like masters), but you’ll discover that in these pages.”
—RIAD NASR, executive chef, Minetta Tavern
 
The Art of Living According to Joe Beef captures Fred and Dave’s complete vision: their unique style of cooking and a warm and wacky atmosphere that always seems to be ahead of the curve. This is everything we love about Joe Beef, without having to fly to Montreal.”
—VINNY DOTOLO and JON SHOOK, Animal and Son of a Gun restaurants
 
“Filled with historic facts, quirky cooking techniques, and food that holds nothing back, this book is overflowing with ingenuity. It reflects, indeed, the art of living according to Joe Beef.”
—CHUCK HUGHES, chef/owner, Garde Manger

About the Author

Frédéric Morin (right) is the co-owner/chef of Joe Beef, Liverpool House, and McKiernan Luncheonette. He attended L''École Hôtelière des Laurentides, worked at Jean-Talon Market selling peppers and onions, and served as garde-manger at Toqué! and chef de cuisine at Globe before opening Joe Beef. When he''s not gardening, tinkering in his workshop, or at the restaurants, Fred can be found at home in Montreal with his wife (and the third partner in the restaurants), Allison, and their two sons.
 
David McMillan (left) is the co-owner/chef of Joe Beef, Liverpool House, and McKiernan Luncheonette. Born and raised in Quebec City, David has been holding court in many of Montreal''s classic restaurants for close to twenty years. He still practices the cuisine Bourgeoise he learned from his mentor, Nicolas Jongleux, and from living in the Burgundy region of France. When David isn''t at the restaurants, he can be found painting at his studio in Saint Henri or spending time at his cottage in Kamouraska, Quebec, with his wife, Julie, and their two daughters.
 
One of the original members of the Joe Beef staff, Meredith Erickson (center) has written for various magazines, newspapers, and television series. Currently collaborating on several books, Meredith splits her time between Montreal and London.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1: Building a Tiny Restaurant in the Middle of Nowhere
 
Little Burgundy was a refuge. To escape our prior workplace, Fred and I would go for drives around Montreal, stopping at hardware stores, food markets, Chinatown, old corner restaurants. Sometimes we would browse junk shops or raid the downtown Salvation Army. Maybe we were already starting to build a restaurant in our minds, or maybe we just needed to get away from the supper-club scene on Boulevard Saint Laurent, where we worked. Either way, we were always on the lookout for old plates, oyster forks, live king crabs, shitty chairs, medicine cabinets, or the ultimate baloney sandwich. All roads led to Little Burgundy.
 
Little Burgundy is an area in southwest Montreal bordering the Lachine Canal. In the mid-1700s, French colonists named it La Petite-Bourgogne because of its resemblance to its namesake in France. It sits on a plateau, south of Mount Royal and just north of the Saint Lawrence River. Home to the Canadian National Railway yards and the Canadian Steel plant, Little Burgundy was, and remains, a working-class neighborhood. For the past ten years, it has been featured in every local magazine’s “next up-and-coming neighborhood” article, but for reasons both obvious and obscure, it has been slow to reach its supposed potential. 
 
Notre Dame is Little Burgundy’s main north-to-south thoroughfare, a street full of inimitable characters, historical edifices, and appealing old boutiques, among them the amazing Grand Central antiques, the eclectic and now sadly defunct Arcadia, the Irish lady junk shop, and the All Things Vintage store. Nearby is antique purveyor Madame Cash, who earned her nickname in the 1960s from cashing government checks for residents in the surrounding row houses. Across the street stands the majestic Corona Theatre. Ella and Oliver Jones played there; so did Oscar Peterson, who was born in Little Burgundy. Around the corner is the ever-abiding Atwater Market. This neighborhood has everything going for it. 
 
Among all this stood Café Miguel, a diamond in the (very) rough located at 2491 Rue Notre Dame West owned by a wildly passive-aggressive troll of a man. He made six killer sandwiches and espresso as strong as it was good. And while his ambition to open a small restaurant was good, he soon ran into trouble—trolls, alas, don’t make good restaurant owners. His trouble was our opportunity, and Allison, Fred, and I got to thinking. We knew we could cook, we knew what the restaurant should look like, and we knew intuitively that we could get people to come to Little Burgundy. But it would take work.
 
For one thing, the café was a bit of a dump, like a dirty pig that wears a dress, too many accessories, and perfume. It had a solid, yet filthy shell and was furnished with IKEA tables, school chairs, and a blackboard with sandwich listings full of spelling mistakes. There was a six-burner stove, a deep fryer, a ventilation hood, an espresso machine, and a working chimney. We would essentially be acquiring the bare bones of a restaurant, which might make it workable, since we had very little money to start.
 
The backyard was full of graffiti, cigarette butts, beer bottles, tiny plastic bags, and what Fred believed was industrial waste. The clientele consisted of local furniture refinishers and antique dealers—basically guys with yellow fingers who stunk of lacquer thinner. Allison, Fred, and I held meetings in my truck in the backyard, during which we brainstormed on what our restaurant might look like, what food we would serve, and who we would harass—or terrorize—for favors to get it off the ground. We had anxiety about putting it all together, and for good reason: we don’t have the organizational skills to do anything. Ask anyone and they’ll tell you that we essentially have the attention spans of ferrets on speed. At least Fred and I do. Allison is the voice of reason.
 
So we met with three friends who also happen to be financial guys, Ronnie Steinberg, Jeff Baikowitz, and David Lisbona, to see if our idea could become a financial reality. We don’t remember much of the meeting except that it was boring, it was held in a boardroom, and after five minutes I was wearing a baseball helmet I picked off a nearby shelf and Fred was chasing me around with no shirt on. The obvious conclusion is that Ronnie, Jeff, and David convinced us it could work (if we did it on the cheap), and they agreed to partner in for 10 percent. Jeff tells us now that when we left the room, he told Ronnie and David to give whatever amount they would feel comfortable never seeing again.
 
We are still partners with these three, and if it weren’t for them, none of this would be possible. If you walk into David Lisbona’s office today, you’ll see seventy-five laminated newspaper clippings about Joe Beef alongside one picture of his kids. Their faith and pride in us are astounding. 
 
 
Building Joe Beef 
 
It took two months to build. We scrounged quickly to make it work. The restaurant came together with love, about twenty packs of wainscoting, and unlimited generosity and interest from friends. Mathieu Gaudet, a Montreal sculptor, friend, and Saint Henri local, built, among other things, our tables. On first glance, they look like they are ebony and mahogany, but they are actually MDF (medium-density fiberboard) combined with that really bad Masonite pressboard and many shiny coats of oil finish. He also built the bar from an old farmhouse floor that probably had fifteen coats of lead paint on it. (Don’t worry, it’s sealed; you can’t go crazy from eating at the Joe Beef bar.) 
 
The beautiful old tavern chairs we found by chance. We spotted them when we were driving around one day and pulled over and asked the guy what he wanted for them. He said twenty bucks—not per chair, but for the lot. 
 
Our friend Peter Hoffer did a beautiful installation of paintings: about twenty small abstracts and landscapes on one wall. We have always liked Peter’s aesthetic, whether it is of Quebec trees or girls without shirts. His art fits our rustic environment and feels like it has always been there. 
 
The eccentric and kooky Joe Battat, another one of our friends and favorite customers, showed up one day in the dining room with a giant bison head. It looks real and is about half the size of a Honda Civic. We zapped it onto the wall of the bathroom, and it has been scaring young kids ever since. 
 
A couple of years back, one of our customers, Howie Levine, gave Fred a fart machine with a remote control. Fred immediately hid it in an ear of the bison, so whenever someone walked into the bathroom and closed the door, Fred would go crazy on the remote and wait for the customer to emerge in a daze of confused humiliation. 
 
The bathroom also boasts old photos taken at Bob Dylan and Neil Young concerts by Joe Battat and the door is covered with old Canadian license plates, fishing permits, and Quebec signage. Serendipitously, all the crazy elements seem to come together.
 
People still show up with old nostalgia-laden items that somehow fit the spirit of Joe Beef—things they’ve found at yard sales, in their grandma’s attic, at the back of the garage. We have a barracuda caught by a Quebec politico, Viking candelabras, bear heads, a grand notice of the beatification of the now good brother Saint Andre, whale bones, trophies (Best Eater: Kevin), pictures of Uncle Jack fishing for salmon in British Columbia, and glasses shaped like naked women. 
 
In other words, ambience is a big part of Joe Beef. The lighting, the music, and what’s on the walls matter a great deal to us. Wine and food are not the only story. A true restaurateur has to be a jack of many trades. You see it all the time in restaurants: the food is good and the wine list is awesome, but the chairs suck, the art on the wall is revolting, and a Café Del Mar CD is playing continuously on the sound system. You can be a good cook or even a great chef, but it doesn’t make you a restaurateur. You have to have other interests, and you have to actually read.
 
Thankfully, Fred, Allison, and I geek out over the same classic stuff: a perfect Adirondack chair, a red vinyl banquette with brass nails, a pretty oyster-bar counter, old enameled cast-iron sinks, industrial lamps, a banged-up Rancilio coffee machine. We like wood, old paint, and a simple touch of cottage. This is why we love Maine, the Gaspé, and Kamouraska. I had so many bad experiences with Montreal’s “hottest” designers, who simply couldn’t design a proper service station, that I ended up buying an old medicine cabinet for Joe Beef. Its shelves, drawers, and glass bottles that once held swabs now hold knives. It works and it looks like it is where it should be. As Joe Beef came together, that’s how it felt in general: like it had always been there.
 
The restaurant group we worked with prior to Joe Beef never understood our cooking, but the customers did. We are thankful for the experience; it just wasn’t for us. We wanted our next project to be different from anything we had done before. We wanted to open a small, simple bistro, not unlike what Sam Hayward was doing with beautiful country food at Fore Street in Portland, Maine. 
 
We imagined we would walk to the market and buy our produce every day. I was going to cook the meats, Fred was going to do the appetizers and vegetables, and then we were going to do the dishes . . . together. Allison would run the dining room, and John Bil would tend bar and shuck the occasional oyster. We would be open for lunch. Seventy bucks would be our top-end wine. Fred would put one lobster item on the menu, but more for him than for anyone else. We figured we might move one or two lobster spaghettis per day but not much more. We just wanted to sell a few oysters, a bit of fish, and a bit of steak.
 
On opening day, the restaurant was packed. It went well. The only crazy thing was that Fred and I shelled fava beans in the backyard for three hours, and we believed that it was going to be that way every day. On the second day of business, we realized we needed to get a proper dishwasher. We also realized at 4:00 p.m. that we had been there since 9:00 a.m. and we wanted to go home. One lunchtime highlight was watching a country gentleman named Mr. Barber eat Dungeness and drink Meursault while wearing classic hunting apparel. Hence, the Grand Opening and prompt Grand Closing of lunch service at Joe Beef. 
 
When we first opened, we thought we would be catering primarily to the antique dealers and other locals who lived on the Lachine Canal. But people actually followed us from our previous workplace, and we were getting customers who wanted to pay for two-pound lobsters, small-farm beef, and small-grower Champagnes and premier cru Burgundies. Fred was thrilled to come up with these dishes, and I was more than willing to work with private wine agents who wouldn’t have dealt with us on Saint Laurent. We had the opportunity to work with modest-sized purveyors because we were working in a different context. All of a sudden, these smaller sources were not only willing to sell to Joe Beef, they were also coming to the restaurant to eat and visit! 
 
We have never experimented with the concept of the food at Joe Beef. It has evolved in some ways, of course, but the food has always been the food we wanted to do since day one. We serve true Bocusian-Lyonnaise  cuisine du marché(French market cuisine), which enables us to roll with the market in a way that wouldn’t be possible with a printed menu. Although some complained that our food “lacks presentation” or is “too simplistic,” we started getting good reviews and earning acclaim soon after opening. Chefs from every corner of the United States started showing up at our door.
 
One night, Fred noticed a ragged-looking Korean American guy ordering everything on the menu. Lo and behold, it was David Chang, owner of New York’s Momofuku. This was right before David was ordered to rest by his doctor. He had boarded a plane for Montreal, landed at Trudeau International Airport, and was at the Joe Beef bar a couple of nights later. The week was, of course, a complete haze of food, wine, and long nights, and David has been a good friend and Joe Beef supporter ever since. The props he gave us were a game changer for us, and now we seem to be part of the North American Food Itinerary. We’re baffled and utterly appreciative. But more important, we are truly happy coming to work every day. 
 
 
 
Foie Gras Parfait with Madeira Jelly
 
Makes 10 to 12 ramekins 
 
This dish, which calls for a whole fresh duck foie gras, has been on our menu since day one. We like it with a thin layer of our Madeira Jelly poured on top, but almost any compote, jam, or jelly can be served alongside.
 
1 whole fresh duck foie gras, about 18 ounces (500 g) 
4 cups (1 liter) milk 
1½ cups (375 ml) whipping cream (35 percent butterfat) 
1 tablespoon brandy
1 teaspoon sugar
Salt and pepper
6 egg yolks
2 whole eggs 
Boiling water, as needed
Black truffle shavings for topping (optional)
Madeira Jelly (recipe follows) 
Toasted brioche or  pain de campagne (country bread) for serving
 
1. Place the liver in a large bowl, and pour the milk over it. Cover and set aside at room temperature for 1½ to 2 hours. You want the liver to soften and to look and feel like a giant piece of Silly Putty. When you have that consistency, take the liver out of the bowl, put it on paper towels, and pat it dry. Throw out the milk. 
 
2. Preheat the oven to 325°F (165°C). Put the cream in a small saucepan and place it over high heat.
 
3. Now, here’s the weird part: Using a table knife, split the liver in half lengthwise. There will be veins and nerves and bile ducts. Basically, anything you see that is red or green should be taken out. It’s not a big deal if you don’t remove it all. Just get what you can. Pat both halves dry. 
 
4. Cut the liver into cubes. The smaller they are, the easier on your blender or food processor. Put the cubes in a large, wide bowl; add the brandy, sugar, and a healthy sprinkle each of salt and pepper; and turn the cubes gently to coat them on all sides.  5. Put the cubes in a blender or food processor and pulse until the cubes are all gone and you are left with a creamy consistency. Add the egg yolks and whole eggs. The cream will be at a boil by now, so take it off the burner. You want to pulse for about 10 seconds, add some cream, pulse for 10 seconds more, add a little more cream, and then pulse again. Continue like this until all the hot cream is added and the liver is smooth and creamy, like a frothy McDonald’s milk shake. 
 
6. Pour the liquid liver through a coarse-mesh sieve into a bowl with a spout or a large measuring pitcher. You need to strain out any nasty bits you may have missed before. Divide the mixture evenly among 10 to 12 ramekins or jam jars, ½ cup (125 ml) each. Select a baking dish just large enough to hold the ramekins without touching (you may need to use 2 baking dishes or bake the parfaits in batches), and line the bottom with a double layer of paper towels. Place the ramekins in the baking dish.  7. Pull out the oven rack, put the baking dish on it, pour the boiling water into the baking dish to reach about halfway up the sides of the ramekins, and push in the oven rack. Bake for 25 minutes, then pull out the oven rack and lightly shake the ramekins. If the liver wobbles stiffly, you’re ready. If not, push in the rack and bake for another 5 to 8 minutes, then test again.
 
8. When the parfaits are ready, remove them from the baking dish and let them cool to room temperature. If you are using the truffle shavings, arrange some on top of each parfait. Cover the parfaits and refrigerate until chilled. Top with the jelly as directed, then re-cover and return to the refrigerator as directed. The parfaits will keep for up to 4 days. Remove from the refrigerator about 10 minutes before serving with the toasted brioche.
 
 
Madeira Jelly
 
Makes 1 cup (250 ml)
 
6 sheets gelatin
 
1 cup (250 ml) Madeira wine
 
6 ½ tablespoons (100 ml) water
 
2 tablespoons maple syrup
 
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
 
1. Bloom the gelatin sheets in a bowl of cool water to cover for 5 to 10 minutes, or until they soften and swell. 
 
2. In a small pot, combine the wine, water, maple syrup, and vinegar over medium heat. When hot, remove from the heat. Gently squeeze the gelatin sheets, add to the wine mixture, and whisk until completely dissolved.  3. If using for the parfaits, spoon a thin layer of the warm liquid over each chilled parfait and refrigerate for 15 minutes to set the jelly. The layer should be 1/8 inch (3 mm) thick. If not using for the parfaits, pour the warm liquid into a jar with a tight-fitting lid and refrigerate. It will keep for up to 7 days. When serving this jelly on a plate, we press it through a ricer to give it a mound of kryptonite appearance.

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5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Insanely good on multiple levels.
Reviewed in the United States on July 19, 2018
Just the best. For those who don''t know, the founders of Montreal restaurant Joe Beef are some of the most insanely bon vivant characters in this world. They''re people who take a 26-hour train ride across Canada just to reminisce about the glory days of the train. Just to... See more
Just the best. For those who don''t know, the founders of Montreal restaurant Joe Beef are some of the most insanely bon vivant characters in this world. They''re people who take a 26-hour train ride across Canada just to reminisce about the glory days of the train. Just to make sure they''re in the lap of luxury they bring along a briefcase full of caviar and wine and foie gras to serve between the train''s meals. These are rare beasts, and getting a peek inside their minds is incredibly fun and fascinating.

"Joe Beef" was named after a rascal who used to run what amounts to a Canadian speakeasy. Between telling tall tales and illegally hiring musical acts that his license didn''t permit, he also kept a selection of exotic animals including bears for the entertainment of the guests. Did I mention he kept the bears drunk most of the time? To name your restaurant after a character like this is a bold statement- and Joe Beef delivers.

This recipe book has it all. From folksy stories, to name-dropping famous chefs who stop by, to every sort of food. On the one hand, this book will teach you how to make tiny sausages and basic sauces to accompany everything from oysters to pulled pork. On the other hand, this book has a "breakfast sandwich" that has you place foie gras between Canadian bacon and a runny egg. One recipe has you serve serve whole lobster parts with spaghetti. It''s a madhouse in here, and they wouldn''t have it any other way. I feel like I''m not conveying the fanciness of some of the more ridiculous offerings- so trust me, this book contains more oysters and marrow bones and lobster than you can shake a lamb chop at.

The opening intro from David Chang says it all. Not to spoil too much, but new-to-the-scene celebrity chef David Chang hears about a place called Joe Beef and wonders what the fuss is about. Chang finally wanders in and orders some oysters, and casually mentions he works in the restaurant industry. The guy at the bar instantly launches into a tirade of insults along the lines of "you look like this guy David Chang- let me tell you about David Chang". A confused Chang slowly realizes the guy behind the bar is one of the owners, who recognized Chang the moment he walked in. Many rounds of wine and food and laughter follow. The chef randomly decides Chang looks like he would enjoy lamb, so he brings in a whole rack of lamb, even though Chang is already about to burst from the previous offerings. That''s the kind of people who run Joe Beef. They''re the sort of people who insult you openly to your face with a wink and a smile because behind their back they''re cracking open a tremendously expensive bottle of wine and planning a whole feast for your enjoyment.

The book itself is amazing. Almost every recipe has a photo, in addition to plenty of behind-the-scene photos. There''s tons of insets with various stories and pointers. In addition to the story of the restaurant and its crew, you get everything from the story of Joe Beef himself, to a travel itinerary of what Canadian rail lines you should ride and what to expect on them. Recipes are roughly divided into sections based on chapter themes. For instance, the train chapter has foods inspired by old sleeper railcar menus which historically could be very fancy indeed. This is just the best formatting I''ve ever seen in a recipe book. It''s incredibly creative, atmospheric, and informative.

Highly recommended for anyone with a good sense of humor and a healthy appetite. You have to have a little twinkle in your eye to appreciate the open-faced "cheval a cheval" (yes, that means a recipe including a horse steak). Absolutely everything is here. Bowls of sausage and onion, an Indian jalfrezi, New England clam chowder, smorgasboards, and throw in some arctic char stuffed with snow crab. Yes, a fish stuffed with crab. Why not? Serve it next to the marrow bones, have a laugh, and keep the wine flowing.
10 people found this helpful
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TG
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It will inject culture into your life like a mosquito delivering the west nile virus
Reviewed in the United States on August 31, 2018
If you are a filthy heathen you need this book. It will inject culture into your life like a mosquito delivering the west nile virus.
7 people found this helpful
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TonyInMontreal
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What every cookbook should be!
Reviewed in the United States on November 9, 2016
These guys just ROCK! I have read tons of books on many subjects and of many genres - this might be the best book I ever read. It''s witty, detailed but not boringly so, and has great stories, recipes, pix, itineraries, even some science! And it''s honest. It makes me want to... See more
These guys just ROCK! I have read tons of books on many subjects and of many genres - this might be the best book I ever read. It''s witty, detailed but not boringly so, and has great stories, recipes, pix, itineraries, even some science! And it''s honest. It makes me want to eat at Joe Beef, Liverpool House and Mckiernan''s - I just can''t afford it!

These people are real restauranteurs with a passion for perfection, not only profit.
7 people found this helpful
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Fizzy
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really rather good
Reviewed in the United States on January 4, 2012
I bought this on the basis that it was featured in ''Lucky Peach'' vol 2. And I consider it a great purchase. Surprisingly approachable and user friendly, I''ve used it twice since I got it a week ago. I made steak tartare as a lunch to take to work and it was viewed jealously... See more
I bought this on the basis that it was featured in ''Lucky Peach'' vol 2. And I consider it a great purchase. Surprisingly approachable and user friendly, I''ve used it twice since I got it a week ago. I made steak tartare as a lunch to take to work and it was viewed jealously by my colleagues. The BBQ sauce is simple but good. I''ll have a crack at a few more things over the coming weeks. Buy it. It''s surprisingly good and whilst it has a Canadian-centric view, it''s not impossible to replicate the recipes. And it''s a fun read beyond the recipes. I wish I had a reason to Canada other than to go to Joe Beef...that would be excessive even by my standards. Unless they want to fly me there to do an ironic Australian review for a magazine or something. I wish.
11 people found this helpful
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jocon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Francophile''s Dream
Reviewed in the United States on April 18, 2014
I am a bit beside myself. This book represents the unfolding of a vision - part eclectic and erudite - of some real characters with real talent for food. The dishes are grounded in the French vernacular, but creatively interpreted without the modern tendency to molecular... See more
I am a bit beside myself. This book represents the unfolding of a vision - part eclectic and erudite - of some real characters with real talent for food. The dishes are grounded in the French vernacular, but creatively interpreted without the modern tendency to molecular approaches. Sometimes simple, sometimes very laborious, these dishes make me wish I lived next door. There is nothing pretentious about them, just unbridled deliciousness. These folks have some serious chops, and the book is a delight to read.
6 people found this helpful
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Michael D. Famico
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
LOVE this book!!!!
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2013
I had a difficult time finding this gem in local book stores, but thank God for Amazon.com!! I couldn''t be happier with this purchase. The book is PACKED with beautiful photos, loads of recipes and stories to keep you entertained throughout. This book would be perfect for... See more
I had a difficult time finding this gem in local book stores, but thank God for Amazon.com!! I couldn''t be happier with this purchase. The book is PACKED with beautiful photos, loads of recipes and stories to keep you entertained throughout. This book would be perfect for the adventurous home-cook as well as the experienced culinary visionaries. This is one of those "cook books" that you leave on the ol'' coffee table for a good read or an occassional thumb-through.
2 people found this helpful
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Big Momma
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Next time I''m in Montreal....
Reviewed in the United States on April 13, 2014
This will be the first restaurant I visit the next time I go to Montreal, Canada. The food is so incredible that reading it makes me want to not make it at home, just go to the restaurant! The two guys who founded Joe Beef''s with their girlfriends and families and friends... See more
This will be the first restaurant I visit the next time I go to Montreal, Canada. The food is so incredible that reading it makes me want to not make it at home, just go to the restaurant! The two guys who founded Joe Beef''s with their girlfriends and families and friends have a nice style of presenting the food and writing about it. If pictures were edible, there would be nothing left of my book!
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Ellen J. Jefferies
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Huh?!
Reviewed in the United States on June 1, 2019
This is NOT a useable cookbook, it''s a book about starting a restaurant. Woopee!!!
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Top reviews from other countries

James Cowin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 8, 2013
I was very reluctant to buy this book with it not having any previous reviews however an article involving the Joe Beef team in Lucky peach made me take a punt. Great book with great ideas of which I have used a few in the kitchen. If you don''t end up cooking from it the...See more
I was very reluctant to buy this book with it not having any previous reviews however an article involving the Joe Beef team in Lucky peach made me take a punt. Great book with great ideas of which I have used a few in the kitchen. If you don''t end up cooking from it the stories will provide you with hours of enjoyment. Can''t wait to visit next year.
I was very reluctant to buy this book with it not having any previous reviews however an article involving the Joe Beef team in Lucky peach made me take a punt. Great book with great ideas of which I have used a few in the kitchen. If you don''t end up cooking from it the stories will provide you with hours of enjoyment. Can''t wait to visit next year.
5 people found this helpful
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mrs h lai
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 19, 2020
Brilliant present
Brilliant present
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Hana
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 6, 2016
Good read
Good read
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Claudio
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Joie de vivre e cucina per appetiti robusti.
Reviewed in Italy on July 28, 2018
Primo libro edito da Joe Beef, ristorante di Montreal aperto nel 2005 da Frédéric Morin e David McMillan, uno dei preferiti di sempre da David Chang (che ne scrive l''introduzione) e dal compianto Anthony Bourdain, mentre ad oggi siamo sulla soglia della seconda...See more
Primo libro edito da Joe Beef, ristorante di Montreal aperto nel 2005 da Frédéric Morin e David McMillan, uno dei preferiti di sempre da David Chang (che ne scrive l''introduzione) e dal compianto Anthony Bourdain, mentre ad oggi siamo sulla soglia della seconda pubblicazione dedicata (Joe Beef, Surviving the Apocalypse). Quella di Joe Beef è una cucina per stomaci forti e appetiti robusti, un bel bistrot su base francese mescolata senza riguardo con influenze locali (fantastici, generosi prodotti nord americani sia di terra che di mare e tecniche particolari come l''affumicatura), ma anche con suggestioni internazionali e italiane (gli spaghetti all''aragosta o all''astice, gli gnocchi di ricotta, la polenta, la “porchetta”), e con punti di riferimento in una galassia di classici rivisitati. Non mancano dunque il foie gras e il midollo, la lièvre a la Royale, l''anatra e gli sformati in crosta, i grandi piatti di manzo, il maiale, le ostriche, le uova, le anguille, lo sgombro, i sottaceti e gli ortaggi coltivati in proprio e, per chiudere, una manciata di dessert. Unico e caratteristico nel suo genere, il libro è confezionato in modo tale (fotografia e design) da avvolgere in pieno il lettore nell''atmosfera e nel colore locale.
Primo libro edito da Joe Beef, ristorante di Montreal aperto nel 2005 da Frédéric Morin e David McMillan, uno dei preferiti di sempre da David Chang (che ne scrive l''introduzione) e dal compianto Anthony Bourdain, mentre ad oggi siamo sulla soglia della seconda pubblicazione dedicata (Joe Beef, Surviving the Apocalypse).
Quella di Joe Beef è una cucina per stomaci forti e appetiti robusti, un bel bistrot su base francese mescolata senza riguardo con influenze locali (fantastici, generosi prodotti nord americani sia di terra che di mare e tecniche particolari come l''affumicatura), ma anche con suggestioni internazionali e italiane (gli spaghetti all''aragosta o all''astice, gli gnocchi di ricotta, la polenta, la “porchetta”), e con punti di riferimento in una galassia di classici rivisitati.
Non mancano dunque il foie gras e il midollo, la lièvre a la Royale, l''anatra e gli sformati in crosta, i grandi piatti di manzo, il maiale, le ostriche, le uova, le anguille, lo sgombro, i sottaceti e gli ortaggi coltivati in proprio e, per chiudere, una manciata di dessert.
Unico e caratteristico nel suo genere, il libro è confezionato in modo tale (fotografia e design) da avvolgere in pieno il lettore nell''atmosfera e nel colore locale.
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NikoTn
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing recipes
Reviewed in Canada on December 4, 2018
Excellent book with mouth watering recipes that are actually feasible to do at home without breaking the bank or spending the entire day. I cant wait to cook through it!
Excellent book with mouth watering recipes that are actually feasible to do at home without breaking the bank or spending the entire day. I cant wait to cook through it!
3 people found this helpful
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