The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale
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Based on Stanford University psychologist Kelly McGonigal''s wildly popular course "The Science of Willpower," The Willpower Instinct is the first book to explain the science of self-control and how it can be harnessed to improve our health, happiness, and productivity.

Informed by the latest research and combining cutting-edge insights from psychology, economics, neuroscience, and medicine, The Willpower Instinct explains exactly what willpower is, how it works, and why it matters. For example, readers will learn:


   •  Willpower is a mind-body response, not a virtue. It is a biological function that can be improved through mindfulness, exercise, nutrition, and sleep.
   •  Willpower is not an unlimited resource. Too much self-control can actually be bad for your health.
   •  Temptation and stress hijack the brain''s systems of self-control, but the brain can be trained for greater willpower
   •  Guilt and shame over your setbacks lead to giving in again, but self-forgiveness and self-compassion boost self-control.
   •  Giving up control is sometimes the only way to gain self-control.
   •  Willpower failures are contagious—you can catch the desire to overspend or overeat from your friends­­—but you can also catch self-control from the right role models.
In the groundbreaking tradition of Getting Things Done, The Willpower Instinct combines life-changing prescriptive advice and complementary exercises to help readers with goals ranging from losing weight to more patient parenting, less procrastination, better health, and greater productivity at work.

Review

"What a liberating book! McGonigal explains the scientific reality of willpower, exploding the myths most of us believe. Stronger willpower—based on inspiring facts, not oppressive nonsense—is finally within everyone''s reach."
—Geoff Colvin, author of Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers From Everybody Else

" The Willpower Instinct is a new kind of self-help book. Using science to explain the why and strategies for the how, McGonigal has created a must-read for anyone who wants to change how they live in both small and big ways."
Book Page

"Each chapter could stand on its own as something helpful, but taken as a whole, this book could be downright life-altering. If you are trying to lose weight, become more successful at work, rid yourself of toxic habits...heck, if you''re HUMAN, you need to read this book."
Library Thing

“This book has tremendous value for anyone interested in learning how to achieve their goals more effectively. McGonigal clearly breaks down a large body of relevant scientific research and its applications, and shows that awareness of the limits of willpower is crucial to our ability to exercise true self control.”
—Jeffrey M. Schwartz, M.D., co-author of You Are Not Your Brain and author of bestselling Brain Lock
 
” **** out of four.”
 — USA Today Book Review
 
“A fun and readable survey of the field, bringing willpower wisdom out of the labs.”
TIME magazine

About the Author

Kelly McGonigal, Ph.D., is an award-winning psychology instructor at Stanford University, and a lecturer and program developer at the Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education. She is also the author of The Joy of MovementThe Upside of Stress, and Yoga for Pain Relief. McGonigal lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Schadstoffsöldner
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very comprehensive, but includes outdated self-regulation research
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2019
It''s been two years since I finished reading this book. I remember that it was very comprehensive. However, the book is in dire need of an update. - A registered replication report (multi-site randomized controlled experiment) found that the ego depletion... See more
It''s been two years since I finished reading this book. I remember that it was very comprehensive. However, the book is in dire need of an update.

- A registered replication report (multi-site randomized controlled experiment) found that the ego depletion descriptions of Chapter 3 are dubious.
- The Marshmellow test described in Chapter 7 has been repeated in a study with a sample size ten times as large as the original study, and the conclusions didn''t replicate.
- Wenzlaff and Bates'' alternative concentration strategy should be included in Chapter 9 as their work qualifies some potential misunderstanding with suppression research. To the author''s credit, she does mention a similar idea ("Turn your ''I won''t'' into ''I will''"), but one that is significantly weaker in my view (i.e., substitution with a similar but slightly more beneficial task and reframing/embellishment of the challenge).

Additionally, while the author highlights interventions in every chapter that have been empirically supported (cited at the end of the book), I''m not convinced that these methods are very powerful, however - especially for people who struggle significantly with self-regulation and/or impulsiveness. I don''t entirely blame the author for that. Research in this area has been lacking. I view the book mostly as a well-written and comprehensive survey, albeit outdated, of the existing literature, rather than a novel contribution to the field. I also am not overly enthusiastic about the overall maturity of self-regulation research. However, Duckworth et al.''s contributions in the Annual Review of Psychology this year (2019) have made me more optimistic in this regard.
165 people found this helpful
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Tom Venuto, Author of Burn the Fat, Feed The Muscle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you feel like a willpower failure, this book will give you hope
Reviewed in the United States on December 4, 2018
Out of all the books on how to build self-control, the one I recommend most is The Willpower Instinct by Kelly McGonigal. There are two reasons why: First, this book is optimistic. After reading what some people have to say about willpower, you might be left with... See more
Out of all the books on how to build self-control, the one I recommend most is The Willpower Instinct by Kelly McGonigal. There are two reasons why:

First, this book is optimistic. After reading what some people have to say about willpower, you might be left with the impression that if willpower is a limited resource, and you deplete it, especially if you have lots of stress in your life, you’re out of luck.

McGonigal, on the other hand, while acknowledging the limits of willpower, tells us how to strengthen our willpower and avoid depleting it in the first place. She also reminds us that the more we use our willpower, the easier it gets in the future, and that just like muscles, we can train our brains to get stronger at self-control.

Second, I found that The Willpower Instinct gives the most practical recommendations. The author is a Stanford psychology professor and her book is based on science, but she doesn''t stop at reporting experiments, she translates research into action strategies. You are urged to be your own scientist, and try your own willpower experiments, keeping the tools that help the most, and discarding any that don''t.

The book begins by explaining what willpower is and why it matters:

You learn that your challenge could come in the form of "I will," which is doing something good for you that you''ve been avoiding, or "I won''t," which is stopping a bad behavior or habit. It could also include "I want," which is remembering an important goal when it matters most.

Willpower, she says, is about harnessing all three of these powers – I will, I won''t, I want – to reach your goals and avoid trouble.

Willpower matters because everyone has self-control struggles, and most people feel like willpower failures; they feel in control one moment, and out of control the next. Most people also believe lack of willpower is the biggest reason they fail to achieve their goals – health, fitness, money, career, academics, time management and relationships.

McGonigal suggests that the best way to understand self-control is to understand why you lose it. This theme recurs throughout the book, as it highlights willpower traps and willpower mistakes.

Some chapters I found especially helpful, as well as fascinating...

Chapter four is about moral licensing, and you learn why we justify being bad because we did something good ("I just ran 6 miles, so I deserve this extra pizza!").

In chapter six you learn how to defeat the diet trap called, “The what the hell effect” ("I already blew my diet with that piece of cake, so WTH, might as well eat the whole thing"). You also learn how to break the cycle and deal with failures or slip-ups, which is (spoiler) self-compassion and forgiveness instead of self-criticism and guilt.

And in chapter eight, titled, "Infected! Why Willpower is contagious," you learn about the massive impact of social influence. One study found that obesity spreads through social networks. If a friend becomes obese, a person''s odds of also becoming obese increase by 171%.

Fortunately it works both ways. If you hang out with a group of people who are setting goals and taking on willpower challenges, you''re more likely to join in and succeed yourself. Goals are infectious, and hanging out with the right people can increase your willpower.

Other willpower-boosting strategies explained in the book include awareness, meditation, relaxation, breath control, exercise, nutrition (including maintaining blood sugar), time in nature, and willpower training. You also learn how to deal with things that drain your willpower including distraction, stress, anxiety, depression, sleep deprivation, and being surrounded by triggers (food etc).

Readers will feel inspired, because McGonigal writes with empathy and makes sure you know you’re not alone: “Everyone struggles in some way with temptation, addiction, distraction, and procrastination. These are not individual weakness that reveal our personal inadequacies - they are universal experiences and part of the human condition.”

The ideas in the book can help you resist temptation, control impulses, avoid distraction, end procrastination, change habits, and control your attention, emotions and desires, in any area of life.

The potential benefits to be gained by mastering self-control are so huge, this is a book you''ll not want to skim. Take your time and study this one.
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mikephd80
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The bible of willpower
Reviewed in the United States on December 9, 2014
If you need more willpower (don''t we all?), then this book is for you. The author leaves no stone unturned as she cites study after study to explain why we lack willpower and how we can get more of it. An important theme throughout the book is awareness-- once... See more
If you need more willpower (don''t we all?), then this book is for you.

The author leaves no stone unturned as she cites study after study to explain why we lack willpower and how we can get more of it. An important theme throughout the book is awareness-- once we understand the circumstances under which we fail to exercise willpower, then we can began to make changes. And as the author points out at the close of the book, the mere act of becoming more self-aware is sufficient enough to create change in some people''s lives. However, do not mistake this to mean that this is simply a book full of academic theory about willpower; rather, each chapter is replete with "experiments" that provide clear-cut guidance as to how you can put the theory into practice in your own life.

Here''s a brief breakdown of each chapter:
1) The author defines willpower, distinguishes between "I will" (I will begin exercising each day) and "I won''t" (I won''t eat fatty foods) challenges, and discusses how we have essentially two warring sides to our personality (the side that wants instant gratification, and the side that wants to achieve our long-term goals). She suggests tracking your willpower choices to increase your awareness and meditation as a means of building willpower (willpower is like a muscle and can be trained to become stronger over time).

2) The author discusses the evolution of willpower and why a lack of willpower may have served an evolutionary purpose (our ancestors would have been wise to consume large amounts of fatty food if given the opportunity, since there was more uncertainty back then about when their next meal might arise), as well as the ways in which stress reduces our willpower (you are sad after a relationship ended and decide to eat a piece of cake as comfort food). As a means of increasing willpower, the author suggests engaging in focused breathing, outdoor walks or activity (just five minutes is sufficient to have an impact), getting adequate sleep, and lying down to relax.

3) The more frequently we exercise willpower, the easier it becomes. Willpower can become drained, and it ebbs and flows throughout the day. Sometimes we think our willpower is exhausted but this is just our brain trying to trick us into conserving energy-- this explains how long-distance runners are able to push on. The author suggests eating a better diet and engaging in certain activities intended to increase willpower.

4) This is easily one of the best chapters-- the author discusses "moral licensing" and how we can use our good behavior (not eating chocolate cake) to justify being bad (eating chocolate cake). The author''s solution is to remind yourself why you were being good in the first place. This section also discusses how we discount the future and assume that tomorrow will be different than today. We tell ourselves we''ll have more willpower tomorrow, but the fact is we will face the same challenges tomorrow that we face today.

5) The author discusses the function of dopamine and how it can prompt us to behave like rats pulling a lever to get an electric shock. Many of our willpower failures (e.g., checking email excessively) are simply us pointlessly trying to get a reward because of a rush of dopamine (that occurs when we hear a trigger, like "You''ve got mail!"). Fortunately, by understanding how dopamine works we can turn it to our advantage by linking rewards to tasks that we''ve been procrastinating.

6) This chapter was counterintuitive and thus incredibly helpful. It turns out that beating yourself up over willpower failures (e.g., I shouldn''t have eaten that Twinkie!) actually makes us more likely to fail again because we''re making ourselves sad (and what do we turn to when we''re sad? More Twinkies, of course!). The author recommends self-acceptance and positivity instead of guilt and self-criticism-- fantasize about how good you''ll feel when you eat healthier foods instead of guilt-tripping yourself about that chocolate bar you ate at lunch.

7) Many of us see the future far different than we see the present-- we naively assume that we''ll be more responsible or have more willpower in the future, so we put off onerous tasks for our "future self" to deal with. Unfortunately, our future self is the same person as our present self, and we''re only tricking ourselves if we think otherwise. An additional problem is that some of us deeply discount the value of future rewards and place far too much emphasis on present rewards (taking $10 today instead of $50 one year from now). The author suggests thinking more about your future self (e.g., using FutureMe.org to write a letter to your future self) to become accustomed to the notion that you and your future self are one and the same. Also, you can "pre-commit" to your future self by doing things like purchasing an expensive gym membership to exercise, but this struck me as a little superficial as someone who is struggling with willpower can simply ignore the commitments they made. On a side note, the author suggests waiting 10 minutes before engaging in any behavior that the present self is screaming for (I NEED to buy that book now!) that I have found incredibly useful.

8) Willpower is contagious-- if you hang out with a bunch of people who are unmotivated, you will be tempted to "mirror" their behaviors and emotions. "Social proof" even suggests that we engage in foolish behavior due to a herd mentality (everybody else is doing it, so I should do it too). The author recommends finding a willpower idol we can look up to (someone we believe exerts exemplary willpower), spend some time reviewing our goals at the beginning of each day, and publicly commit to our willpower challenges so the pressure of not disappointing our friends and family can motivate us to exercise self-control. I can personally attest to the power of publicly committing to a challenge, as I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2012 and saw many hikers continue onward simply because they didn''t want to tell everyone they didn''t have what it takes to go on. Of course, this strategy isn''t fool proof-- otherwise hundreds of people wouldn''t quit the trail each year. But knowing that other people are watching is certainly an incentive to exercise willpower. The author also mentions getting a willpower buddy and holding each other accountable, which works for the same reasons that making a public commitment does.

9) This chapter seemed a little out of place. The book had been discussing willpower and then all of a sudden it takes a U-turn and starts discussing how unpleasant thoughts can intrude in our minds. However, I soon saw the value in what the author was saying as well as how it fits into the overall willpower picture. The main idea is that we cannot control whether we have unhelpful or even disturbing thoughts, and suppressing such thoughts only causes us to focus on them more. Instead, we need to accept these thoughts, but also acknowledge that we are not compelled to act on them. The author cites an entertaining study about a group of people who were asked not to think of white bears but subsequently could think of nothing else. The trick is to allow yourself to permit the thought (or urge, say to smoke a cigarette) rather than fighting it. We can''t control our thoughts, but we can control whether we choose to act on them, and trying to suppress our thoughts only increases the probability we will act on them. Again, it''s counterintuitive, but it''s supported by an ample amount of research which the author weaves into the narrative of the book.

10) A good conclusion, albeit a little brief.

This book is an excellent addition to the positive psychology genre, and I can easily see how this became such a popular class at Stanford (where the author is a professor).

If you want to know why you don''t have the willpower you wish you had and how you can take action to change this, then stop procrastinating and exercise the willpower to buy this book :)
299 people found this helpful
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Maria
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not going to help you long-term
Reviewed in the United States on May 14, 2019
Did it help me personally with my goal? No Did I learn new and interesting information about out brains and behaviors? Yes If you are interested on why people fail or succeed with their goals, this book will teach you the psychology behind it by citing... See more
Did it help me personally with my goal? No
Did I learn new and interesting information about out brains and behaviors? Yes

If you are interested on why people fail or succeed with their goals, this book will teach you the psychology behind it by citing numerous studies and facts; however, as far as helping you reach your goal? It fails. Read one chapter each week and made it to chapter 8 but I did not see any improvements and I know why. This book teaches you how to “consciously” achieve your goals. Unfortunately the author failed to highlight that p the subconscious mind is WAY more powerful than the conscious mind. I mean you may see results but they won’t last, because the subconscious will always win. Real lasting results are made when you reprogram your subconscious mind. So this book is a recipe for failure if you want to achieve long lasting results. I was hesitant when I saw “willpower” in the cover (because willpower will never be as powerful as the subconscious mind) but decided to give it a try because of the excellent reviews. Not going to lie it was pretty funny, interesting ,educational, and well-written but as far as helping me make long lasting changes is no from me
17 people found this helpful
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Tom Hackim
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Willpower - When the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.
Reviewed in the United States on February 26, 2016
Just when I thought that I might not need to read just 1 more self-help book... "The Willpower Instinct..." by Dr Kelly McGonigal is a must read. It is probably the best self-help book I have read. As a self-employed person for going on 30 years sometimes the... See more
Just when I thought that I might not need to read just 1 more self-help book... "The Willpower Instinct..." by Dr Kelly McGonigal is a must read. It is probably the best self-help book I have read. As a self-employed person for going on 30 years sometimes the ''spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.'' Thus, the Willpower to press ahead... when a bit too much life is going on etc etc and so forth - is a big deal. But this is a very PRACTICAL book with many exercises that help to kind of "smack you up side the head", to get back on track. One of the best ideas of the book, is in Chapter 7 on "FUTURE HAPPINESS versus the economics of instant gratification. In summary that is expressed as - How much more is my happiness worth today than tomorrow? Go back and read that again. She also brings up the idea to focus on the future and make it real. Finally, the book is very humorous and well written. Dr McDonigal has a great sense of humor. I summarized the book into 5 pages and refer to it often. FABULOUS book!!
39 people found this helpful
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AmyK17
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life Changing
Reviewed in the United States on March 2, 2016
I originally bought the Kindle edition, with audio (whyspersinc). After listening/reading twice, I bought the paperback and read again with a highlighter. It''s not just a self help book where the author yammers on with their beliefs on some matter that temporarily inspires... See more
I originally bought the Kindle edition, with audio (whyspersinc). After listening/reading twice, I bought the paperback and read again with a highlighter. It''s not just a self help book where the author yammers on with their beliefs on some matter that temporarily inspires the reader. Everything she says in this book is backed up by bonafide (*fascinating*) studies and research. Furthermore there are practical exercises to take baby steps to putting change in action. Everyone has SOMETHING they want to accomplish. This book will get you there.
38 people found this helpful
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blanca
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
We cannot, so we can...
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2017
The other day I was supposed to take a behind the wheel test after a couple of failures. Frankly speaking, I felt like running away from that because I seemed like blowing that again. I felt small and couldn’t reveal my worries. At that time I encounter <THE WILLPOWER... See more
The other day I was supposed to take a behind the wheel test after a couple of failures. Frankly speaking, I felt like running away from that because I seemed like blowing that again. I felt small and couldn’t reveal my worries. At that time I encounter <THE WILLPOWER INSTINCT> luckily. I’d come to start to read right after watching the articulate speech given by Kelly Mcgonigal on TED. The topic wasn’t identical with that of this book but I was struck by her eloquent talk deeply. I had a craving for her more lectures. And this book had come to me.
First of all, she combines scientific explanations and the description of human nature in reality exquisitely. Furthermore she guides readers to conduct Willpower experiments in daily life. If you’d like to make a optimistic change in your life, this book will be a great guidance. The thing is that I become to understand human nature more deeply thanks to this book. To accept the truth that we cannot overcome our impulse completely can be a breaking point to obtaining our willpower.
Last but not least, I passed that. Whatever. I cannot deny Willpower has been a big help in this small accomplishment. I was able to face my fear and get over it.
15 people found this helpful
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Scott G. Daniel
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting but ultimately unimpactful for this 40 year old scientist
Reviewed in the United States on January 12, 2021
Usually I simply write a Pro’s and Con’s list for Amazon reviews but I feel this book merits a little more. As my title says, I appreciated many of the scientific studies mentioned in this book (and would have discarded it right away if the author’s points did not have any... See more
Usually I simply write a Pro’s and Con’s list for Amazon reviews but I feel this book merits a little more. As my title says, I appreciated many of the scientific studies mentioned in this book (and would have discarded it right away if the author’s points did not have any evidence) but I found the “homework” at the end of each chapter to be not-so-useful. Admittedly, I only did the homework for the first few chapters and then stopped when I wasn’t really seeing results. Perhaps if I had been part of the class that the author teaches, I would have found more *willpower* to follow through with all the exercises.
I found some of the book frustrating because I had read some of the topics elsewhere. Namely, Chapter 2 was all about exercise, sleep, and stress when it comes to willpower. It wasn’t very surprising to me that all three are linked to willpower.
There were two confusing concepts in the book. One was the idea of “moral licensing”; being good gives us the license to be bad. I interpreted this for my willpower challenge thusly: that by being good (which for me was focusing more on my job) I gave myself license to play many hours of video games. The author’s example was for someone who’s willpower challenge was to eat more healthily; this someone would justify having a chocolate cake because they had eaten a salad. And then, in another chapter, the author suggested that setting a reward for good behavior was perfectly acceptable and actually increased willpower. I can only guess that the difference here is the intention. If I plan ahead and say “if I do X then I can have Y” that is good for my willpower. On the other hand, if I’m doing something naughty and rationalize “well, I’ve been good in the past so I can be bad now” then that is bad for my willpower.
The most interesting part of the book for me was the idea of the future self. I think a lot about growing old but I don’t often feel “close” to 60 year old me. Thinking of my future self as a good friend that I love can definitely increase some self-compassion and perhaps I will focus on things that are more important rather than mindlessly playing video games for hours on end.
A scary part of the book was about collective willpower. The idea that the world is too stressed out to care about the long-term effects of environmental damage is downright terrifying. Sadly, it makes a lot of sense and doesn’t fulfill me with much hope for the future of mankind.
If you are still undecided on reading this book I would suggest this: find a friend or a group to go through it with. If you, like me, don’t have that great of willpower to start with, it seems silly to think we could get through the book and all the exercises on our will alone! That being said, now that I have read through the book it’s possible I might go back and do the rest of the exercises (selecting the ones I think would be most relevant). As a suggestion for the author, it would have been nice if there was a discussion forum where I could have joined a virtual accountability group.
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Top reviews from other countries

Mike
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great help
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 18, 2018
I love this book. Each chapter covers a different aspect of willpower with exercises to test on yourself to see if it helps you to improve your willpower. There is humour in the book and it is easy to follow. Highly recommend this to anyone struggling to achieve their goal.
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Magic Mark not Mike
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
You''ll get a new kind of superpower.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 15, 2021
This is such a transformative book. It requires you to do the toughest thing though... be honest with yourself. Kelly McGonigal does an incredible job of explaining how our brain works, and why we have these feelings and how to identfy them. In the grand scheme of humanity,...See more
This is such a transformative book. It requires you to do the toughest thing though... be honest with yourself. Kelly McGonigal does an incredible job of explaining how our brain works, and why we have these feelings and how to identfy them. In the grand scheme of humanity, the modern society we live in now has only just been invented, and so most of the things our brain does, isn''t necessarily required in todays world, but there it is, all still happening. When you first fully understand that neuro-marketing is real, and then how they do it and how your brain responds to such inmputs, this book will kind of give you a superpower... improved willpower, and the ability to get sh*t done. You''ll need to actively practice, read and review and you will build the habit and strengthen your willlpower muscle. Knowledge *is* power, and will you be a total Willpower god after reading this? Of course not, but you will have the blueprint to improve it. Stopping the "I''ve been good, so I''ll be bad" mindset is worth the price of the book alone, I challenge anyone to read it and not identify some part of themselves in this book, and then think "Oh yeah, I do that... all the time!" If you''re about to take on a tough challenge of any kind, or want to change the way you think or just generally have more control over the things you do (like stopping doom scrolling on social media), this book along with Mindset by Carol Dweck are the two best books I can recommend. Since reading these books (and a few more), in the last two years I''ve gone from being an uneducated overweight and ignorant estate agent that was blaming everyone else for my own failures, to a rock climbing (not overweight) self taught software engineer working for a Silicon Valley tech company, who can recognise failures, own them, and do something about them. This book is the icing on the cake, and I''ll forever recommend it to anyone who wants more freedom in their life.
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AforL
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Inspired by research and inspiring change
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 7, 2021
I’ve enjoyed reading and implementing the ideas in this book. The practical exercises have enabled me to think through and plan needed changes in a realistic way. The book offers multiple insights and has helped me in ways that make a real difference.
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N.B
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Decent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 17, 2020
A little hard to get into for me but it was a decent book
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david lockwood
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I love this book it is filled with a huge amount ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 29, 2014
I love this book it is filled with a huge amount of practical information and it references many very interesting studies. I find it easy to read which is important to me as a dyslexic. It has changed the way I think of willpower in a way that has been useful. I believe...See more
I love this book it is filled with a huge amount of practical information and it references many very interesting studies. I find it easy to read which is important to me as a dyslexic. It has changed the way I think of willpower in a way that has been useful. I believe that the information and techniques will continue to be of benefit through my life, in other words BUY IT
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The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale

The Willpower sale Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What outlet sale You Can Do to Get More of It outlet online sale